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Thread: Dual Canadian-US Citizenship Not Permitted????

  1. #1
    Veteran of Misadventures
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    Dual Canadian-US Citizenship Not Permitted????

    I recently asked a friend of mine who is from Canada originally and works in my field whether he had dual citizenship. I was very surprised by his answer. He told me that while Canadians are permitted to enjoy dual citizenship with other countries, the United States does not permit dual U.S.- Canadian citizenship. Hence, this friend was required to renounce his Canadian citizenship when he became a U.S. citizen. I asked this friend (originally from Ontario) whether this bothered him, and he replied "not really."

    I was surprised to hear this. In the back of my mind I asked him the question because I would not mind holding a dual citizenship, if possible. But I would never renounce my U.S. citizenship, for any reason, so I guess I can't.

    I wonder what are the policy reasons behind this?

  2. #2
    I think if your already a U.S. citizen you can become a Canadian citizen without having to give up your U.S. citizenship. The Canadian gov. allows dual citizenship. It's if your Canadian and want to become an Amercian citizen the American gov. may require you to renounce your citizenship. I personally would never give up my Canadian citizenship even though at times I get sick of this goverment we have and the lack of leadership in this country.

  3. #3

    Smile Dual Citizenship

    EB,

    Visit:
    http://www.amcits.com/dual.asp

    Should answer most of your questions without
    getting into tax ramifications etc.

  4. #4
    Veteran of Misadventures
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    Renunciation

    Eastender,

    The information contained in this page, while somewhat confusing, appears to contradict the prior poster by indicating that if I applied for Canadian citizenship I would have to renounce my U.S. citizenship. I should note that I am an American citizen by birth in the U.S.

  5. #5

    Smile Dual Citizenship

    EB,
    Actually quite clear - if it is your intent to
    renounce your USA citizenship you may
    do so but it is not a condition.

  6. #6
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    EB,

    I believe this page from the State department shows that dual citizenship is tolerated in many cases. http://travel.state.gov/law/citizens...nship_778.html

    When, as the result of an individual's inquiry or an individual's application for registration or a passport it comes to the attention of a U.S. consular officer that a U.S. citizen has performed an act made potentially expatriating by Sections 349(a)(1), 349(a)(2), 349(a)(3) or 349(a)(4), the consular officer will simply ask the applicant if there was intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship when performing the act. If the answer is no, the consular officer will certify that it was not the person's intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship and, consequently, find that the person has retained U.S. citizenship.
    Canada does not seem to have a problem with dual-citizenship, assuming you meet their other rules for citizenship. http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/citizen/dual-info.html

    Respectfully,
    Ned
    Nobody does it better...

  7. #7
    Veteran of Misadventures
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    Here is the language that is confusing me (from Ned's link):

    "However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship."

    I would have to apply for Canadian citizenship, so does that mean I must renounce my U.S. citizenship?

  8. #8
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    EB,

    I don't believe so. This, I think, is what they mean by a "routine" oath. If you do not have the intention of giving up US citizenship, you retain it.

    Obviously, because of the potential consequences, this is something you should check out with the State Department before doing, but I don't think you would have any problem with it. As a US citizen, even if living in a foreign country, you retain the privilege of paying US Income Tax. There are exclusions, the first 85K of income, and others, but ultimately, they like keeping US Citizens where they may potentially continue to contribute to Uncle Sam.

    Edit: Additionally, you may want to look at this page, with lots of links.
    http://www.richw.org/dualcit/

    Respectfully,
    NN
    Last edited by Ned Nobody; 06-21-2005 at 01:04 AM.
    Nobody does it better...

  9. #9
    ‹^› ‹(•¿•)› ‹^› Special K's Avatar
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    NN,

    Thanks for the links, very informative. By the way, where the hell ya been lately? I haven't seen many posts from you in awhile. It'd be good to see you back regularly as I've always been a fan of your contributions to this place.

    Hope you're well,

    SK

  10. #10
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    SK,

    Out of town more than in recently, but hopefully that's going to change now.

    See you at the usual place, I'm sure, in a couple of weeks.

    NN
    Nobody does it better...

  11. #11
    I have a similar friend who is formerly Canadian but recently attained US citizenship.

    He tells me that he still keeps his Canadian passport locked away and he can still use it in event of extreme emergency.

    This leads me to believe that the renouncement of Canadian citizenship may be just a formality, and that there's no verification that that was actually done.

  12. #12
    To apply for Canadian citizenship, don't you have to like, live & work there for several years?

    It's ok to make frequent trips for hobbying, but MOVING there is a life-changing thing.

    I would assume that you'd first have to find a job there. To do that, you and your employer would have to demonstrate that no existing Canadian can do the job. Maybe you're in some highly specialized field or something, but somehow, that sounds difficult to do.

    Even after all that is done, you're left with your new life in Canada. For an American, this is going to mean higher taxes, much more than you've ever paid in the States. In addition, I would venture to guess that Canadian companies are likely to pay less than American companies for equivalent work. Not to mention the fact that you'll be on the other end of the exchange rate.

    If it means that much to you, then by all means go for it. But it certainly doesn't sound easy.

    My formerly Canadian friend said that the high taxes come as a shock to Americans who move there.

    As an alternative, couldn't you get some really long visa or something? Like what an ex-patriate does?

  13. #13
    proud infidel
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    Quote Originally Posted by bond_james_bond
    To apply for Canadian citizenship, don't you have to like, live & work there for several years?


    In addition, I would venture to guess that Canadian companies are likely to pay less than American companies for equivalent work.
    You took the words right out of my mouth, james bond. I would assume that you have to have lived in Canada for a while (3 years?) before you can even be considered a potential candidate for Canadian citizenship.

    As far as salaries are concerned, i've always thought that, in general, they were higher in Canada than in the States for equivalent work.

    fml
    fml

  14. #14
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    I have been advised that Ned is correct. The only caveat is that if I became a dual U.S.-Canadian citizen, and then decided to work for or join some aspect of the Canadian government (e.g., become a Parti Quebec member - yikes!!!!!!!!), the U.S. would require me to give up my U.S. Citizenship. I believe a further caveat is that each time I re-entered the U.S., I would be required to reaffirm my U.S. citizenship and my loyalty to the U.S.
    Last edited by EagerBeaver; 06-21-2005 at 09:56 AM.

  15. #15
    The only problem with dual citizenship is if both countries have a military draft and you qualify then you're screwed. It almost happened to me.
    But then you can always go to Canada

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