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Thread: What is the difference between a French Canadian and a Quebecois?

  1. #1

    What is the difference between a French Canadian and a Quebecois?

    I see these two terms used quite interchangeably. Not sure if they do mean the same thing.

    A French Canadian would be someone who is Canadian but has some ancestral roots in France in the same way as an Irish Canadian is a Canadian with some ancestral roots in Ireland.

    A Quebecois would be someone who was born and raised in Quebec or at least has spent a significant portion of his/her life in Quebec.

    Est-ce une interprétation correcte?

  2. #2
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    I don't think a Muslim, Chinese, etc. immigrant ( arrived at age 10 and now 40 ) would be accepted as a Quebecois even if he called Quebec his home. Quebecois would need bloodlines and French Canadian would be someone anywhere in Canada with French background. Outside the big cities ( Montreal ) the tolerance for visible minorities is very low for acceptance , even a Caucasian non francophone would have a hard time being accepted as a Quebecois if he/she has any accent.
    I do not think outside the box, I do not think inside the box, I do not even know where the box is.

  3. #3
    In the 1800's up to approximately the 1970's people would refer to themselves as french-canadians and anglophones as '' anglais'' . Then with the rise of the independance movement started the expression '' québécois''.

  4. #4
    Pierre Trudeau was a French Canadian, Pauline Marois is a Quebecois.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Sol Tee Nutz View Post
    even a Caucasian non francophone would have a hard time being accepted as a Quebecois if he/she has any accent.
    This is a good point, but it goes even beyond that. There are numerous french communities outside of Quebec. Don't forget NB is the only bilingual province in Canada and has approximately a 40% native french speak population (leur langue maternelle est le français) and every other Canadian province has a minority french population. But as a general rule people outside of Montreal, and even some within, will not accept people who don't have a Quebec accent even if they've been speaking french their entire lives. In that aspect I've observed that Quebec is unfortunately rather xenophobic.

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    A Quebecois is someone living in the province of Quebec. It's the equivalent of an Nova-Scotian, Ontarian or Newfoundlander.

    A French Canadian is someone who is of Canadian citizenship and their mother tongue is French and/or their heritage's is French, generally descendants of French colonists. Acadians, Franco-Manitobans and the Franco-Quebecois, for example, are all examples of French Canadians.

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    Wilfrid Laurier, Louis St-Laurent, Jean Chretien & Pierre Elliott Trudeau were french-canadians from Quebec (a.k.a. Quebecois) who were once Canada's Prime Ministers.

    Former Prime Minister Paul Martin is a french-canadian who was born in Ontario. He's not a Quebecer, but an Ontarian. He could also be described as being a Franco-Ontarian. But since he now resides in Montreal, he now could be considered a 'Quebecois'. Or as a Quebecer, if you happen to be anglophone.

    Pauline Marois, Jacques Parizeau & Rene Levesque are/were french-canadians from Quebec (a.k.a. Quebecois) who also happened to be separatists, wanting Quebec to separate from Canada. Some may also regard these separatists as being bigots or even racists.

    Singer Roch Voisine, hockey star Claude Giroux & writer Yves Lavigne are french-canadians born outside of Quebec. They are not Quebecois/Quebecers.

    Former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, hailed as "The Boy from Baie Comeau", was born & raised in Quebec. However, even though fully billingual, he's not considered as being a french-canadian since his primary language is english. Therefore, he's a Quebecois/Quebecer, but not a french-canadian.

    A Quebecois/Quebecer is anyone born and/or residing in the province of Quebec, were he french, english, spanish, haitian, chinese, etc.

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    It all depends on who you are asking

    Quote Originally Posted by Java View Post
    Pierre Trudeau was a French Canadian, Pauline Marois is a Quebecois.
    I love the quote, perfect.
    The difference between a Casino and a church is when you pray in a Casino you actually mean it.

  9. #9
    Merber
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Holliday View Post
    Singer Roch Voisine
    ... but in France he will be seen as part of the invasion of québécois singers, because it'd be too complicated to go into the nuances.
    In Quebec, québécois can cover different groups depending on who's speaking, and who they're speaking to.
    It's actually quite handy, but very imprecise, making it quite a challenge to define a Charter of Quebecois Values: those of the Montreal cosmopolitan elite? of the rural regions?
    (I also always suppress a laugh when people mention the American Values: what values do a LA porn actor, a MIT researcher and a midwest farmer really share?)
    o . o . b . e

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    a.k.a. NewestGuy
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    Quote Originally Posted by oobe View Post
    (I also always suppress a laugh when people mention the American Values: what values do a LA porn actor, a MIT researcher and a midwest farmer really share?)
    Love of farm animals?

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    Quote Originally Posted by oobe View Post
    ... but in France he will be seen as part of the invasion of québécois singers, because it'd be too complicated to go into the nuances.
    It will be more the invasion of canadian singers and not québécois singers. People from outside Canada do not make the difference between Québec and the rest of Canada.

  12. #12
    Original Dude
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    A Quebecois is someone living in the province of Quebec. It's the equivalent of an Nova-Scotian, Ontarian or Newfoundlander.

    A French Canadian is someone who is of Canadian citizenship and their mother tongue is French and/or their heritage's is French
    If you are thecnical yeah...

    But separatist don't like french canadian cause it has the term canadian in it... we call ourselves quebecois as like quebec is a country... even if "thecnically" its not yet. But its more or less a matter of how you see yourself and Quebec really. When i see a quebec flag at a balcony i think its normal... its cool. When i see a canadian flag im like "wtf..." even tough i know i should not, cause its still canada after all but i find it strange... lol Like i said many time, i don't hate canada or such, its just i don't feel being part of it, to me its a whole different world... Im sure if i would go to ontario by reflex i would wait at the border with my passeport... lol.
    Life is a party ! Death is the Hangover.. 70-49-6

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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronVonKinkazoid View Post
    A Quebecois is someone living in the province of Quebec. It's the equivalent of an Nova-Scotian, Ontarian or Newfoundlander.

    If you are a visible minority born in Quebec or born in quebec of immigrant parents then you are not considered "Quebecois"

    The Quebecois consider these people Canadian even if their birth certificate says Quebec.
    "Just When I Thought I Was Out.....They Pull Me Back In!!!"

  14. #14
    This guy will explain it to you...lol

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZS7sOOpELI
    "The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist"

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    The late Paul Desmarais, born in Sudbury (Ontario), was a franco-ontarian who later became a quebecer/quebecois.

    He was one of Canada's wealthiest Canadians.

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