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Thread: STD Human papillomavirus awareness and vaccinated ?????

  1. #1
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    STD Human papillomavirus awareness and vaccinated ?????

    Hi all
    Human papillomavirus is a contractible disease through sexual activity are escorts made aware that a vaccine does exist to minimize the risk ?
    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a DNA virus from the papillomavirus family that is capable of infecting humans. Like all papillomaviruses, HPVs establish productive infections only in keratinocytes of the skin or mucous membranes. Most HPV infections are subclinical and will cause no physical symptoms; however, in some people subclinical infections will become clinical and may cause benign papillomas (such as warts [verrucae] or squamous cell papilloma), or cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, oropharynx and anus.[1] HPV has been linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.[2] In addition, HPV 16 and 18 infections are a cause of a unique type of oropharyngeal (throat) cancer.[3][4]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_papillomavirus,
    In more developed countries, cervical screening using a Papanicolaou (Pap) test or liquid-based cytology is used to detect abnormal cells that may develop into cancer. If abnormal cells are found, women are invited to have a colposcopy. During a colposcopic inspection, biopsies can be taken and abnormal areas can be removed with a simple procedure, typically with a cauterizing loop or, more commonly in the developing world—by freezing (cryotherapy). Treating abnormal cells in this way can prevent them from developing into cervical cancer.
    HPV vaccines (Cervarix and Gardasil), which prevent infection with the HPV types (16 and 18) that cause 70% of cervical cancer, may lead to further decreases.

    Genital infections[edit]
    Since cervical and female genital infection by specific HPV types is highly associated with cervical cancer, those types of HPV infection have received most of the attention from scientific studies.

    HPV infections in that area are transmitted primarily via sexual activity.[43]

    Of the 120 known human papillomaviruses, 51 species and three subtypes infect the genital mucosa.[44] 15 are classified as high-risk types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 68, 73, and 82), 3 as probable high-risk (26, 53, and 66), and 12 as low-risk (6, 11, 40, 42, 43, 44, 54, 61, 70, 72, 81, and CP6108).[45]

    If a college woman has at least one different partner per year for four years, the probability that she will leave college with an HPV infection is greater than 85%.[46] Condoms do not completely protect from the virus because the areas around the genitals including the inner thigh area are not covered, thus exposing these areas to the infected person’s skin
    Vaccines[edit]
    Main article: HPV vaccine
    Two vaccines are available to prevent infection by some HPV types: Gardasil, marketed by Merck, and Cervarix, marketed by GlaxoSmithKline. Both protect against initial infection with HPV types 16 and 18, which cause most of the HPV associated cancer cases. Gardasil also protects against HPV types 6 and 11, which cause 90% of genital warts.

    The vaccines provide little benefit to women having already been infected with HPV types 16 and 18, which includes most sexually active females.[79] For this reason, the vaccine is recommended primarily for those women not yet having been exposed to HPV during sex. The World Health Organization position paper on HPV vaccination clearly outlines appropriate, cost-effective strategies for using HPV vaccine in public sector programs.[80]

    Both vaccines are delivered in three shots over six months. In most countries, they are approved only for female use, but are approved for male use in countries like USA and UK. The vaccine does not have any therapeutic effect on existing HPV infections or cervical lesions.[81] In 2010, 49% of teenage girls in the US got the HPV vaccine, while in comparison around two-thirds of teens received shots for meningitis and DPT vaccine.[82]

    Women should continue to seek cervical screening, such as Pap smear testing, even after receiving the vaccine. Cervical cancer screening recommendations have not changed for females who receive HPV vaccine.[81] Without continued screening, the number of cervical cancers preventable by vaccination alone is less than the number of cervical cancers prevented by regular screening alone.[83][84]

    Both men and women are carriers of HPV.[85] The Gardasil vaccine also protects men against anal cancers and warts and genital warts.[86]

    No efficacy trials for children under 15 have been performed.[83] Duration of vaccine efficacy is not yet answered by rigorous methodologic trials. Cervarix efficacy is proven for 7.4 years with published data through 6.4 years while Gardasil efficacy is proven for 5 years.[83] Age of vaccination is less important than the duration of efficacy.[83]
    Condoms[edit]
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that male "condom use may reduce the risk for genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection" but provides a lesser degree of protection compared with other sexual transmitted diseases "because HPV also may be transmitted by exposure to areas (e.g., infected skin or mucosal surfaces) that are not covered or protected by the condom."[87]

    Female condoms provide somewhat greater protection than male condoms, as the female condom allows for less skin contact.[88]

    Studies have suggested that regular condom use can effectively limit the ongoing persistence and spread of HPV to additional genital sites in individuals already infected
    All should minimize the risk ,be safer
    BookerL

  2. #2
    GOOGLE: MochaLaMulata MochaLaMulata's Avatar
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    It's unfortunate that some medication, treatments, and vaccines are expensive, when health is the most important thing in life.

    Alot of people won't even think about getting the Gardasil vaccine just because it is out of their budget...
    Three shots are needed in a period of six months, and each of them cost 184$.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MochaLaMulata View Post

    Alot of people won't even think about getting the Gardasil vaccine just because it is out of their budget...
    Three shots are needed in a period of six months, and each of them cost 184$.
    Hi MochaLaMulata
    You seem to be a well informed SP and conscientious on your health and others ,awareness does limit the risk .
    Keep on your good work !!
    Are you aware if Stella organisation would offer the vaccine for free?
    Kind Regards
    BookerL

  4. #4
    GOOGLE: MochaLaMulata MochaLaMulata's Avatar
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    I know about Stella, but I've never been to their office, and never contacted them for information. I wouldn't know about the free vaccine, but I'm assuming they wouldn't give them out freely. It wouldn't be profitable as they do have to purchase the shots.

    I've always dealt with Clinique L'Actuel on deMaisonneuve.
    Nice place, newly renovated, warm staff, and professionnalism at it's best.
    Full STD HIV AIDS check-up is 25$, and I believe there is a discount for students.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MochaLaMulata View Post
    I've always dealt with Clinique L'Actuel on deMaisonneuve.
    Nice place, newly renovated, warm staff, and professionnalism at it's best.
    Full STD HIV AIDS check-up is 25$, and I believe there is a discount for students.
    Hi all Hi MochaLaMulata

    Excellent infos for all too know about thanks
    Warmest Regards
    BookerL

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MochaLaMulata View Post

    I've always dealt with Clinique L'Actuel on deMaisonneuve.
    Nice place, newly renovated, warm staff, and professionnalism at it's best.
    Full STD HIV AIDS check-up is 25$, and I believe there is a discount for students.
    How long is the waiting time to get your results back?

  7. #7
    GOOGLE: MochaLaMulata MochaLaMulata's Avatar
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    It's a three-week wait for 25$. If I'm not mistaking, I think it's 80$ if you want your results the same day or same week.

    You can call them up for more accurate information.

    Clinique L'Actuel
    1001 De Maisonneuve Est
    514-524-1001

  8. #8
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    A news message http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/the-hpv-v...-too-1.1639708

    The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is linked to cancers in both men and women, which has one local doctor wondering why the Quebec government currently only offers the vaccine against it free to girls.
    For five years, the province has had a program in place that offers the HPV vaccine to girls under the age of 18 without cost.
    “I don’t think we can get away with discriminating like that,” said Dr. John Bray, Ob-gyn. ”I don’t think it’s fair.”
    PHOTOS

    Should the HPV vaccine be free for boys in Quebec too?
    Bray says that more and more parents are becoming interested in getting the vaccine for their sons.
    “Let’s face it, everyone gets HPV,” he said. “I don't care who you are, as soon as you get sexually active you get it. Ninety per cent of us get rid of it with our immune systems, but 10 per cent don't.”
    That said the price tag isn't cheap, about $450 dollars per boy, not necessarily covered by private insurance.
    The sexually transmitted disease can cause throat and rectal cancer in men, and is the leading cause of most head and neck cancers in males under the age of 40.
    But, Quebec's public health institute says that the issue isn't considered urgent at this point.
    “At the current cost of the vaccine and at the population level, the cost-effectiveness ratio is above threshold used in strategies that has to be prioritized,” explained the institute's Chantal Sauvageau.
    Bray still thinks that vaccinating both sexes is the way to go, and also points to the need to consider the gay population.
    Head and Hands, a local non-profit that offers medical services to teens and young adults, agrees with Bray.
    “I don’t think that public health should be based on assumptions about what people are doing, and the kinds of risks people are taking,” said the organization’s Juniper Belshaw.
    Public health officials are pushing the federal government for a national plan. They say that buying more vaccines would make the cheaper, and potentially – free for all


    Read more: http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/the-hpv-v...#ixzz3AFeGGHlr

  9. #9
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    http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/mouth-t...-men-1.3120824

    Mouth and throat cancers caused by the human papilloma virus have been rising steadily over the past two decades, with a “dramatic” increase among Canadian men, according to a new report from the Canadian Cancer Society.
    The full report on HPV-related cancers is available here
    The special report on HPV-associated cancers, released Wednesday as part of the 2016 Canadian Cancer Statistics breakdown, says the rate of mouth and throat cancers in men is poised to surpass the rate of cervical cancer diagnoses in women.

    Researchers and doctors have known for decades that certain strains of HPV – the most commonly sexually transmitted disease in Canada and the world -- cause cervical cancer. But the latest Canadian cancer statistics show that only 35 per cent of HPV cancers are cervical, and that about 33 per cent of HPV cancers occur in males.
    The latest data show that about one-third of all HPV cancers in Canada are found in the mouth and throat.
    Between 1992 and 2012, the incidence of HPV-related mouth and throat cancers increased 56 per cent in males and 17 per cent in females.
    In 1992, the age-standardized incidence rate (or ASIR) of those cancers was 4.1 per 100,000 Canadian males. In 2012, it was 6.4 per 100,000 males. In females, the rate was 1.2 in 1992 and 1.4 in 2012.
    ‘I thought I was done’
    Three years ago, Dan Antoniuk noticed a lump on his neck and initially thought that it was just a swollen gland.
    But when the Edmonton father went to see a doctor, he was diagnosed with Stage 4 throat cancer, caused by HPV.
    “I was devastated. I thought I was done,” Antoniuk, 61, told CTV News. “It shattered me, it shattered my family and affected everybody sitting in the waiting room.”
    Antoniuk said that until his diagnosis, he had never heard of HPV cancers in men. His doctors told him that, despite the late stage of his cancer, his prognosis was still good with the right treatment. He underwent surgery, radiation and chemotherapy and although the treatments took a toll on his body, he’s now doing well.
    “The end result is I am here, I am healthy and I can do most of the same things I have done before,” he said. “The ultimate message is: Be aware of your body and be aware of the fact that this could be something more serious and there is hope now.”
    Dr. Hadi Seikaly, a professor and oncology surgeon at the University of Alberta, said doctors are seeing more HPV-related cancers in both men and women.
    “The surprising thing is that we’re just seeing the front end of the epidemic,” he told CTV News. “And it is an epidemic … cervical cancer rates are coming down and head, neck cancer rates are going up.”
    Doctors say that oropharyngeal cancers (which include the back of the throat, the base of the tongue and the tonsils) and cancers of the mouth used to be mostly found in older patients who smoked, drank heavily or had other health issues. But it’s now more common to see HPV-related throat and mouth cancers in younger, otherwise healthy patients.
    “HPV is without question driving the dramatic increase we are seeing in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC),” Dr. Joseph Dort, the chief of otolaryngology head and neck surgery at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, told CTV News.
    “Our most recent data shows that about 70 per cent of our new cases of this cancer are HPV positive. Recent studies suggest that oropharyngeal cancer will become the most common HPV-associated malignancy by the year 2020, surpassing cancer of the cervix,” he said in an email.
    The changing face of the disease
    Jennifer Cicci was shocked to learn that she had oral cancer caused by HPV after a lump appeared on the side of her neck in the fall of 2013.
    The dental hygienist and mother of four from Brampton, Ont., said she was an otherwise healthy woman in her 40s who didn’t have any of the typical risk factors associated with head and neck cancers.
    Cicci’s surgeon removed a baseball-sized mass of tissue from the back of her throat and a section from the back of her tongue. She also underwent laser surgery and radiation, with painful side effects.
    Still, she feels she “got off easy,” despite the entire ordeal.
    In some cases, mouth and neck cancer treatments can have devastating effects on a patient’s ability to speak and eat. Some patients have had parts of their tongues and even their voice boxes removed.
    The good news, doctors say, is that HPV-related cancers seem to be more treatable. More than 80 per cent of patients will survive if the cancer is caught in time.
    “I felt like having this gave me an opportunity to raise awareness of something that I felt was becoming an epidemic,” Cicci said.
    Dr. Brian O’Sullivan, a head and neck cancer specialist at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, said that HPV infections in the throat and mouth are largely linked to sexual contact, but he has also seen patients who have had very few sexual partners and little experience with oral sex.
    Calls for more widespread HPV immunization
    The Canadian Cancer Society estimates that nearly 4,400 Canadians will be diagnosed with an HPV-caused cancer (that can include cervical, vaginal, anal and oral) and about 1,200 will die from it in 2016.
    The society is focusing its messaging on cancer prevention and informing the public about the HPV vaccine. The two HPV vaccines approved by Health Canada are Gardasil and Cervarix.
    HPV immunization is already available through publicly-funded school programs across the country, starting between Grades 4 and 7, up to age 13. But while the vaccine is offered to girls in all provinces and territories, only six provinces -- Alberta, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island and Quebec – also offer it to boys.
    The Canadian Cancer Society is calling on the remaining provinces and territories to expand HPV immunization to boys.
    Robert Nuttall, the society’s assistant director of health policy, also said that adults should talk to their doctors to see whether they can benefit from the HPV vaccine. However, there is currently no scientific evidence showing the benefits of HPV vaccines in older adults.
    In Canada, Gardasil is approved for use in females aged 9 to 45, and males aged 9 to 26. Cervarix is approved for use in females between the ages of 10 and 25, but is currently not approved for boys and young men.
    The vaccine works best in people who have not been exposed to HPV. That’s why it is given to school-aged children and teens as a preventative measure.
    It will be a while before scientists can conclusively determine whether HPV vaccines can prevent throat and neck cancers, since it can take many years for an HPV infection to cause malignancies.
    In the meantime, Dr. Seikaly says it’s important for Canadians to understand this disease could happen to anybody, because the modes of HPV transmission aren’t fully understood.
    “They need to understand the signs and symptoms of it. And those include pain in your throat, difficulty swallowing, neck masses, ulcers in your mouth and throat,” he said. “And they need to make sure during their physical that doctors do look in their mouth and their throat.”
    Early symptoms of mouth and throat cancers can often be vague, but they also include white or red patches inside the mouth or on the lips, persistent earaches and loose teeth.
    As a dental hygienist who was also a cancer patient, Cicci urges regular exams of the mouth and throat during dental visits.
    “What I try to do is to break down the stigma that is attached to (HPV),” she said. “The fact of the matter is, while most of the time it is still being sexually transmitted … we don’t know all the modes of transmission.”
    Other notable statistics from the 2016 cancer report:
    Cancer is still the leading cause of death in Canada, causing 30 per cent of all deaths.
    An estimated 2 in 5 Canadians are expected to develop cancer in their lifetime, and an estimated 1 in 4 will die from cancer.
    An estimated 202,400 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer, and 78,800 will die of cancer in 2016.
    Lung, colorectal, breast and pancreatic cancer are the most common causes of cancer death, with lung cancer accounting for more than 25 per cent of all cancer deaths.
    More than 60 per cent of Canadians diagnosed with cancer today will survive at least five years. But the survival rates vary greatly depending on the type of cancer involved.



    Cheers




    Booker

  10. #10

  11. #11
    i just read the immunine system keeps warts in cheick. but what happens as you age? come 60-80 yrs old yourr immune system aint firing all cylinders, are peeps with warts gonna get them popping up everywhere theyve had it prior?

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