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Thread: Montreal porn industry

  1. #1

    Montreal porn industry

    The TV show CityLife on MaTV recently had a show about the Montreal porn industry.

    Citylife: Thursday January 28, 2016

  2. #2
    There really is no porn industry in Montreal, just nude dancers willing to F on camera to have the ability to brag that they were in a porn video.

  3. #3
    Montréal is the third largest porn production capital (sic) in the world after LA and Amsterdam according to this show. It's hard to believe. However the piece is very well done, interviewing many people. Very informative. Thanks for posting.

  4. #4
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    For those interested, a good read:
    http://news.nationalpost.com/news/ho...-porn-industry

    Altought they have sold and moved the headquarters to the Luxembourg this company helped to get Montreal on the map for this industry (altought I also doubt montreal is third).

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jalimon View Post
    Altought they have sold and moved the headquarters to the Luxembourg this company helped to get Montreal on the map for this industry
    Money knows no boundaries. Mindgeek could as well be registered in Singapor. The two founders met at Concordia, but they don't control their business in Montreal. Their main thing is controling huge porn websites.

    That does not make Montreal a "capital of porn". Mindgeek doesn't even own a production company in Montreal. They own Brazzers but that's american.


    They name no more then 4 production companies in Québec: the art of blowjobs, eighty four,Pegas and Production Québec je viens. Those 4 don't make Montreal the third porn production "capital" of the world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gugu View Post
    Money knows no boundaries. Mindgeek could as well be registered in Singapor. The two founders met at Concordia, but they don't control their business in Montreal. Their main thing is controling huge porn websites.

    That does not make Montreal a "capital of porn". Mindgeek doesn't even own a production company in Montreal. They own Brazzers but that's american.


    They name no more then 4 production companies in Québec: the art of blowjobs, eighty four,Pegas and Production Québec je viens. Those 4 don't make Montreal the third porn production "capital" of the world.
    I agree gugu, that is why I said I really doubt Montreal is 3rd. In fact it's almost impossible that Tokyo could be behind montreal...?

    Actually the founders of Mindgeek are not even working for the company any more. Most of them invested on a condo project in Laval and some other things.

    There is also Bruno B and Vid Vicious and some, I think, new live cam based company. But that still is pale in comparison to all the japanese studio that comes from Japan...

    Cheers,

  7. #7
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    I am so glad someone else has addressed this. Just because the production company exists in MOntreal does not mean anything is produced. I worked for that company ages ago when it had a different working name, and NONE of the video content is made here. Which means it does not contribute to the immediate porn culture here. There is a lot of underground and independent porn that is created here, but like many people have said it doesnt have the wight or polished look of Brazzers.

  8. #8
    Can you actually sell porn these days when it is free and all you can eat on the internet?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rollin Hand View Post
    Can you actually sell porn these days when it is free and all you can eat on the internet?
    For many Internet business the importance is the traffic you get, then often to a much less extend, what you can sell.

    Cheers,

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jalimon View Post
    For many Internet business the importance is the traffic you get, then often to a much less extend, what you can sell.

    Cheers,
    Views and clicks = $$$
    You could also earn commission redirecting people to paying sites such as games, subscriptions, etc.

  11. #11
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    A profile of Mindgeek, the Montreal based company that dominates the porn industry these days through its ownership of most of the main "tube" sites:

    http://thewalrus.ca/the-pleasure-principle/

    ...If Qwebec Expo attendees, sequestered behind curtains in Marriott’s basement, represent the remnants of the old order of adult entertainment, several kilometres across town, in a brightly lit six-storey building on Décarie Boulevard, is one of porn’s epicentres. Originally called Mansef, and later Manwin, MindGeek is today an international conglomerate that controls a major portion of the smut people watch online. The company didn’t invent anything. Instead, its success is due to a trait they share with major tech firms: a rapacious acquisitions strategy. Sensing the revenue-potential in the abundance of porn online, it went on to acquire and create many of the popular tube sites that ultimately brought the industry to its knees. MindGeek realized that, given the scale of global porn consumption, free porn could be monetized. By undermining competitors, buying them out and then consolidating the network under a single corporate structure, it could generate enough traffic so that if even the tiniest fraction of consumers actually subscribed, the model is still lucrative...
    Strasser: You see, Captain, the situation is not as much under control as you believe.
    Renault: My dear Major, we are trying to cooperate with your government, but we cannot regulate the feelings of our people.
    Strasser: Captain Renault, are you entirely certain which side you're on?
    Renault: I have no conviction, if that's what you mean. I blow with the wind, and the prevailing wind happens to be from Vichy.

  12. #12
    A poor corrupt official CaptRenault's Avatar
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    Here's an interesting review in The New Yorker of a book about the modern day porn industry. The article mentions Mindgeek but it does not mention the presence of Mindgeek in Montreal.

    It's also interesting that the corporate Mindgeek site makes no mention of their dominant position in the porn industry.

    Making Sense of Modern Pornography
    While the Internet has made porn ubiquitous, it has also thrown the industry into severe decline.

    By Katrina Forrester
    newyorker.com
    9/26/2016

    If you watch pornography, it’s likely that you do so on the Internet. The days when consuming pornography meant buying or borrowing a pinup magazine or watching a film loop in a peepshow booth are long gone, as are those of tracking down adult-video stores in faraway neighborhoods. Most porn is viewed on easily accessible “tube sites,” such as YouPorn, RedTube, XVideos, and Pornhub. These work on the same model as YouTube: they are free, and steer users to amateur videos, snippets uploaded by commercial producers, and pirated material. Watching pornography no longer requires leaving the privacy of your home, though that doesn’t mean you necessarily do it there: according to a recent CNBC report, seventy per cent of American online-porn access occurs during the nine-to-five workday.

    Pornography has changed unrecognizably from its so-called golden age—the period, in the sixties and seventies, when adult movies had theatrical releases and seemed in step with the wider moment of sexual liberation, and before V.H.S. drove down production quality, in the eighties. Today’s films are often short and nearly always hard-core; that is, they show penetrative sex. Among the most popular search terms in 2015 were “anal,” “amateur,” “teen,” and—one that would surely have made Freud smile—“mom and son.” Viewing figures are on a scale that golden-age moguls never dreamed of: in 2014, Pornhub alone had seventy-eight billion page views, and XVideos is the fifty-sixth most popular Web site in the world. Some porn sites get more traffic than news sites like CNN, and less only than platforms such as Google, Facebook, Amazon, and PayPal. The twenty-first-century porn kings aren’t flamboyant magazine owners like Larry Flynt, whose taboo-breaking Hustler first published labial “pink shots,” in the mid-seventies, but faceless tech executives. The majority of the world’s tube sites are effectively a monopoly—owned by a company called MindGeek, whose bandwidth use exceeds that of Amazon or Facebook. Its C.E.O. until recently was a German named Fabian Thylmann, who earned a reported annual income of a hundred million dollars; he sold the company while being investigated for tax evasion.

    The millions of people using these sites probably don’t care much about who produces their content. But those who work in porn in the United States tend to draw a firm line between the “amateur” porn that now proliferates online and the legal adult-film industry that took shape after the California Supreme Court ruled, in California v. Freeman (1989), that filmed sex did not count as prostitution. Since then, the industry has been based in Los Angeles County’s San Fernando Valley, where its professional norms and regulations have mimicked its more respectable Hollywood neighbors. In “The Pornography Industry: What Everyone Needs to Know” (Oxford), Shira Tarrant explains how that industry works in the new age of Internet porn, and sets out to provide neutral, “even-handed” information about its production and consumption.

    It’s not an easy task. Since the “porn wars” of the seventies and eighties, when feminists campaigned against the expanding pornography industry (and other feminists sided with Hustler to defend it), talking about pornography in terms of mere facts has seemed impossible. The atmosphere of controversy makes it hard to avoid moral positions. Even to suspend judgment may be to take sides.
    In 1995, the porn actress Jenna Jameson signed her first contract with a new porn studio called Wicked Pictures. She was twenty, ambitious, and already making a name for herself. In her memoir, “How to Make Love Like a Porn Star” (2004), she recalled meeting the studio’s founder in a rickety corrugated-steel office in an industrial park. “The most important thing to me right now is to become the biggest star the industry has ever seen,” she told him. “So you can either sign me or I can go to another company and take them to the top. It’s up to you. I’m going to be a star with or without you.”

    Jameson and Wicked found each other at the right time. There had, of course, been stars before her. Linda Lovelace’s performance in “Deep Throat,” in 1972, made porn mainstream; later, her denunciation of the movie, which she characterized as filmed rape, made the idea of the porn star as victim mainstream, too. In the mid-eighties, the revelation that Traci Lords had been underage in her most famous films led to the prosecution of producers, agents, and distributors under child-pornography statutes, and new legislation resulted in stricter age-verification requirements for porn actors. But by the time Jameson arrived on the scene the industry had become an efficient star-making machine. It had distributors and advertisers, production teams and industry magazines, shoots requiring permits, agents who sold the talent and trade associations who represented them. Jameson quickly achieved her ambition, becoming the industry’s biggest star and most reliable brand. By 2005, her company, ClubJenna, had an annual revenue of thirty million dollars.

    Things are different now. Much online porn is amateur and unregulated. It’s hard to tell how much, because there’s little data, and even larger studios now ape the amateur aesthetic, but applications for porn-shoot permits in Los Angeles County reportedly fell by ninety-five per cent between 2012 and 2015. Now most films have low production values, and they are often unscripted. Sometimes you can hear the director’s voice; apparently, many viewers can make do without the old fictional tropes of doctors and nurses, schoolgirls, and so on—the porn industry itself having become the locus of fantasy. Where performers like Jameson had multi-film contracts with studios like Wicked or Vivid Entertainment, such deals are now rare, and most performers are independent contractors who get paid per sex act.

    Tarrant’s book sheds useful light on the bargain-basement world of contemporary porn. In 2012, one agent claimed that the actresses he represented received eight hundred dollars for lesbian scenes, a thousand for ones with a man, twelve hundred or more for anal sex, and four thousand for double penetration, but there’s reason to think that these figures are inflated. Stoya, a well-known performer who has written about her life in the industry, has cited a rate of just twelve to fourteen hundred dollars for double penetration. Wages have declined across the board. Tarrant estimates that a female performer filming three anal scenes a month would make forty thousand dollars a year.

    Riskier acts are incentivized. According to one analysis of an industry talent database, women entering the business now will do more, and more quickly, than they once did: in the nineteen-eighties, they would wait an average of two years before a first anal scene; now it’s six months. Jameson famously never did anal (though one of her most viewed Pornhub clips is “Jenna Jameson accidental anal,” which shows, in slow motion, that on the Internet there’s no such thing as never). From 2000 on, she had only one onscreen male partner—her husband. “I look at these new girls today and I think, What the hell are they doing?” she said in 2004. “These girls don’t know that you have to start slow, baby, and make them pay you more for each thing you do.”
    Today, most porn actresses don’t stick around long enough to start slow. The average career is between four and six months. Performers work long hours with no benefits and they have to cover significant out-of-pocket costs. Tests for S.T.D.s can be as much as two hundred dollars a month. Add to this grooming, travel, and the usual freelancer expenses and it costs a lot to be legal in the porn industry.

    In a context of declining wages and rising costs, attempts at regulation are unpopular. In 2012, Los Angeles County passed Measure B, a law mandating condom use in porn shoots there. Advocacy organizations for performers have resisted the measure, saying that it ignores the preferences of their workforce and would compel performers to use not only condoms but also safety goggles and dental dams. More important, perhaps, it also ignores consumer preferences: in an age when few pay for porn, producers don’t want to alienate those who do. The regulated industry has developed other ways to avoid condoms—preëxposure treatments, production moratoriums when infections are detected, and, in some gay studios, a working assumption that performers are H.I.V. positive. Other producers, rather than comply, have left California for Nevada or Florida. The industry may have created the norms that dominate online porn, but it’s being squeezed into irrelevance, and preferences have taken on a life of their own.
    So it is that, even as the Internet has made pornography ubiquitous, the industry itself, at least as Tarrant describes it, is in severe decline. Like the music business—where albums have been disaggregated into individual tracks sampled on YouTube or bought on iTunes—porn today is a plethora of thumbnail clips from which users pick and choose. And, just as many musicians treat recording as a loss leader in a career built on live performance and merchandising, many porn performers supplement their earnings with various forms of offscreen sex work.

    Whether you see porn as just another sector disrupted by the Internet or as a still powerful engine of profit-driven exploitation depends on a thornier set of debates that shape how pornography is understood. To talk about porn purely in terms of costs and incentives is not, as Tarrant suggests, neutral. Even to stress the work involved is a political move.

    When America’s pornographic secrets have been publicly aired, they have usually taken the form of First Amendment issues. In 1988, the Supreme Court overturned a ruling against Hustler that had awarded damages to the evangelical pastor Jerry Falwell, the founder of the conservative organization the Moral Majority. (The magazine had published a satirical ad in which Falwell described his “first time” with his mother.) Flynt became an unlikely liberal hero, cementing a coalition between free-speech defenders and pornographers. After California v. Freeman, the Adult Film and Video Association of America renamed itself the Free Speech Legal Defense Fund, and, later, the Free Speech Coalition...
    Strasser: You see, Captain, the situation is not as much under control as you believe.
    Renault: My dear Major, we are trying to cooperate with your government, but we cannot regulate the feelings of our people.
    Strasser: Captain Renault, are you entirely certain which side you're on?
    Renault: I have no conviction, if that's what you mean. I blow with the wind, and the prevailing wind happens to be from Vichy.

  13. #13
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    There's one thing about porn industry in Montréal: the girls they cast always look like wores or drugs addict, full of tatooes, piercing every where, weird color hairs, etc....

  14. #14
    A poor corrupt official CaptRenault's Avatar
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    Here's more about MindGeek from La Presse, obviously en français . It somehow seems appropriate that the company that dominates the world of porn should be based in Montreal. However almost none of the porn accessible on MindGeek sites like Youporn and Pornhub is produced in Montreal.

    L’énigme MindGeek, du Luxembourg à Montréal
    lapresse.ca

    10 Oct., 2016


    Maxime Bergeron La Presse
    LUXEMBOURG — MindGeek a beau être devenu un géant mondial de l’industrie du porno, avec 2,4 milliards de visites mensuelles sur ses sites web XXX, son siège social passe complètement inaperçu. Sur la façade de l’immeuble, dans le quartier des affaires de la ville de Luxembourg, le logo de la banque chinoise ICBC apparaît en grosses lettres. Il faut s’approcher de la porte pour qu’un petit panneau annonce le nom de l’entreprise.
    À l’interphone, une réceptionniste nous indique qu’aucun dirigeant de MindGeek ne se trouve sur place. Ni aujourd’hui ni demain. « Personne ne travaille ici, personne ne travaille à partir d’ici », précise-t-elle. Au quatrième étage, où se trouve officiellement le siège social du groupe, c’est le calme plat au cœur de l’après-midi. Le silence est total.

    À 5700 km de là, en bordure de l’autoroute Décarie, à Montréal, l’ambiance est beaucoup plus animée. Les employés entrent et sortent à bon rythme des bureaux de MindGeek par un vendredi matin de septembre, quelques semaines après notre visite au Luxembourg.

    C’est ici que se trouve la majorité des employés de MindGeek, un conglomérat aux racines montréalaises qui détient plusieurs des sites pornos les plus connus du web, de PornHub à YouPorn en passant par RedTube, Brazzers et Men.com. Le chiffre d’affaires annuel du groupe se calcule en centaines de millions de dollars canadiens – jusqu’à 800 millions, affirment deux sources qui occupent ou ont occupé des postes stratégiques dans l’entreprise, une information qu’il a été impossible de confirmer.

    Les effectifs montréalais de MindGeek sont regroupés dans un immeuble discret recouvert de panneaux-miroirs, en face de la célèbre Orange Julep. Les drapeaux du Québec et du Canada flottent devant le bâtiment, ainsi qu’un autre arborant une ampoule – le logo de MindGeek, qui se présente sur son site web comme « un chef de file mondial de l’industrie des technologies de l’information ». Les lieux sont gardés sous haute surveillance, grâce à un système de guérites électroniques.
    « MindGeek dit être établi au Luxembourg, mais la vérité est que son siège social est à Montréal. »
    — Le blogueur Mike South

    M. South documente depuis des années les activités de MindGeek sur son site, l’un des plus consultés de l’industrie de la porno.

    DISCRÉTION ABSOLUE

    MindGeek recherche la discrétion. Les deux dirigeants du groupe, les Montréalais Feras Antoon et David Tassillo, n’accordent presque jamais d’entrevues. Ils n’apparaissent que très rarement dans l’actualité. M. Antoon s’est retrouvé dans la ligne de mire de l’Autorité des marchés financiers (AMF) le printemps dernier, lorsqu’il a été nommé dans le cadre d’une enquête pour délit d’initié liée à Amaya (PokerStars). Le grand patron de MindGeek aurait réalisé des profits de 83 429 $ avec les transactions en cause, selon l’AMF. Aucune accusation n’a été portée.

    La demi-douzaine d’employés et d’ex-travailleurs à qui nous avons parlé a requis l’anonymat, par crainte de représailles ou de poursuites. Plusieurs ont signé des ententes de non-divulgation. Une note interne a aussi été envoyée aux employés du groupe l’été dernier pour leur interdire de parler à des journalistes, alors que La Presse posait des questions.
    MindGeek a refusé nos nombreuses demandes d’entrevue. Dans un bref courriel, la porte-parole Catherine Dunn a indiqué ne pas comprendre pourquoi un « journal local » souhaitait faire le portrait d’une entreprise internationale.
    « Notre siège social est au Luxembourg et nous avons seulement un bureau au Canada, donc je ne suis pas certaine de voir l’intérêt pour vos lecteurs. »
    — Catherine Dunn, de MindGeek

    50 OFFRES D’EMPLOIS

    MindGeek est devenu au fil des ans un employeur de premier plan dans la métropole, en dépit de sa discrétion sur la place publique. Le groupe compte environ 900 travailleurs sur le boulevard Décarie, selon plusieurs sources. Ses autres employés – entre 100 et 500, évaluent diverses sources – sont répartis dans une dizaine de pays. Une cinquantaine d’offres d’emploi – pour des programmeurs informatiques, des développeurs de publicité, des spécialistes en marketing ou en ressources humaines – sont affichées ces jours-ci sur le site web du groupe, presque toutes à Montréal. Les hauts dirigeants de MindGeek vivent et travaillent dans la métropole, selon plusieurs sources internes de l’entreprise.
    Si MindGeek est devenu un employeur important à Montréal, sa structure financière offshore soulève aussi de nombreuses questions chez les experts en fiscalité consultés par La Presse. Plusieurs des bureaux du groupe sont situés dans des juridictions fiscalement clémentes, peut-on constater sur le site web du groupe, comme le Luxembourg, l’Irlande et Chypre, alors que le gros de sa force de travail est au Québec.
    Le siège de sa filiale MindGeek USA est au Delaware, État reconnu pour l’opacité de son système financier. L’entreprise tire aussi des profits de plusieurs dizaines de millions d’une filiale située à Curaçao, île des Caraïbes reconnue pour son régime fiscal très attrayant (voir autre texte). Ces deux emplacements ne figurent nulle part sur le site web officiel du groupe.

    MindGeek a enregistré une série d’entreprises au Luxembourg entre 2010 et 2013, démontrent des documents du Registre de commerce et des sociétés de ce petit pays européen. MindGeek S.A.R.L. (société à responsabilité limitée), la société mère qui chapeaute toutes les filiales du groupe, a été immatriculée officiellement en octobre 2013. À l’époque, MindGeek Holding inc., située sur le boulevard Décarie, à Montréal, était « l’associé unique » de ce holding luxembourgeois, confirment les documents obtenus par La Presse.

    OPTIMISATION FISCALE

    Sans connaître les détails de la structure financière de MindGeek, trois experts en fiscalité internationale que La Presse a consultés estiment que l’entreprise doit chercher à minimiser sa facture en impôts au Québec et au Canada. « On parle ici d’optimisation fiscale. Cela ne veut pas dire que c’est illégal, ça veut juste dire d’être agressif dans la planification fiscale », explique Omri Marian, professeur en droit fiscal à l’Université de la Californie à Irvine et spécialiste en fiscalité internationale.
    André Lareau, professeur en droit fiscal à l’Université Laval, souligne les importantes exemptions d’impôts dont bénéficient les sociétés de technologies de l’information en vertu de la convention fiscale entre le Canada et le Luxembourg. Selon cette entente, les redevances versées par une filiale canadienne à sa société mère luxembourgoise sont exemptées d’impôts au Canada, et taxées à moins de 6 % au Luxembourg (voir onglet 4 pour les détails). Un avantage « majeur » qui pourrait se traduire en millions d’économies d’impôts, selon le spécialiste.

    Il a été impossible d’obtenir des chiffres précis sur les finances ou le niveau d’impôts payé par MindGeek, une société à capital fermé. Revenu Québec et l’Agence du revenu du Canada ont tous deux refusé d’indiquer si des enquêtes étaient en cours ou avaient été menées au sujet des activités du groupe. On sait toutefois que les finances de l’entreprise sont vérifiées de près par une firme comptable reconnue – Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton – , qui a refusé notre demande d’entrevue.

    LA FILIALE DE DUBLIN

    MindGeek réalise une bonne partie de ses activités de facturation à Dublin, où elle a inauguré sa filiale MG Billing en 2013. C’est là que sont traités les revenus d’abonnement de ses dizaines de milliers de clients payants, qui allongent jusqu’à 30 $US par mois pour accéder à certains sites XXX. « Toute la facturation transite par là », confie une source interne, bien au fait de la structure financière du groupe.

    Selon un article récent du journal irlandais Sunday Business Post, qui se base sur des chiffres officiels, MG Billing Ireland Ltd. a enregistré des revenus de 353 millions d’euros (521 millions CAN) pendant ses deux premières années d’existence. Ce bureau emploie 15 personnes, indique l’article.

    Les documents déposés par la dizaine de filiales de MindGeek au Luxembourg dressent par ailleurs un portrait fragmentaire des finances du groupe. Une filiale, appelée Licensing IP International S.A.R.L., semble englober plusieurs des activités de MindGeek. Cette entité fait état d’actifs totalisant 805 millions US (1,06 milliard CAN) pour l’exercice financier 2014 et d’un passif équivalent. Les dettes et les autres sommes dues s’élèvent à 680 millions US (892 millions CAN), dont une bonne partie est financée à des taux d’intérêt élevés, entre 14 % et 21 %, selon ces documents.

    « C’est une entreprise extrêmement endettée, mais qui génère des flux de trésorerie incroyables », avance une source du secteur financier qui a travaillé de près avec MindGeek au cours des dernières années.

    « AMORAL »

    Michel Nadeau, directeur général de l’Institut sur la gouvernance d’organisations privées et publiques, souligne que les sociétés multinationales dont le siège social est au Luxembourg – et elles sont nombreuses – bénéficient de l’opacité du système financier local. Sans connaître le détail des structures de MindGeek, il rappelle que les procédés d’« optimisation fiscale » sont utilisés par un grand nombre de sociétés canadiennes. Une situation qu’il dénonce.
    « Tout cela est amoral, mais il y a des traités entre le Canada et le Luxembourg qui permettent ce genre de situation-là, qu’il faut revoir », déplore-t-il.
    Strasser: You see, Captain, the situation is not as much under control as you believe.
    Renault: My dear Major, we are trying to cooperate with your government, but we cannot regulate the feelings of our people.
    Strasser: Captain Renault, are you entirely certain which side you're on?
    Renault: I have no conviction, if that's what you mean. I blow with the wind, and the prevailing wind happens to be from Vichy.

  15. #15
    Thanks to one of the previous posts, I checked out http://theartofblowjob.com which says that most of their actresses are from Quebec and Ontario (filmed in MTL). The trailer/preview looks really nice, good quality. I haven't paid for porn since I was a teenager... so I hve two questions:
    1) anybody have a subscription or know where to find some of their clips?
    2) I am pretty sure that I recognized (only see part of her face and shoulder), one of the independant sweethearts that works in Montreal Does anyone know if any SPs have performed on http://theartofblowjob.com ? One of the things about seeing an sp is that the moment passes, and with time so do the memories. Would be nice to see one of the girls onscreen, as a reminder of what took place (especially the girl that I think that I may have recognized).

    Any info appreciated -- thanks!
    Last edited by gino12; 10-16-2016 at 01:51 PM. Reason: discretion

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