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Thread: The book thread

  1. #1
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    The book thread

    I though I would create a spin off thread after reading the thread The Davinci Code.

    EagerBeaver described the book by saying:
    As for the Da Vinci Code, I read the book and was not so impressed with it. I think what really made the book was the controversial theme. It did hold my interest, but it was hardly the best novel I have read in recent years.
    Personally I enjoyed the book for two reasons: It was written well enough to hold my interest, and two It's theme led to some rtruly wonderful conversations with some of my friends where we ended up pondering life, history and the meaning of the universe.

    I am always on the lookout for new books (both fact and fiction) to add to my book list. What are some of the books you have read that you can reccomend? What are some of your all time favorites? Which do you consider to be must reads?

    Naughtylady, (and book worm)
    Ronnie

    If I have a little money, I will buy a book, If there is any left over I wll worry about food and rent.
    They will forget what you said,
    they will forget what you did,
    but they will never forget the way you made them feel.

  2. #2
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    All I have been reading lately is stuff for school...

    Spiderman>>> So are you enjoying the biography? Is it well written? Entertaining? Easy to follow? (A man with such a diverse life has got to have a complicated biography to complie!)

    Ronnie,
    Naughtylady
    They will forget what you said,
    they will forget what you did,
    but they will never forget the way you made them feel.

  3. #3

    Fyodor Dostoevsky

    I read everything and have what is known as a classical liberal arts background. Nowadays, I do not read enough novels, however, when I do, I prefer classics like Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. This man's genius is unparalleled - he penetrates the human psyche like no other author I have ever read.

    GG

  4. #4
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    Keep it coming, I am so glad I started this thread.

    Kaempferrand>>> Dare I ask which two are required reading for an agency in training their companions? Also could you tell us a little about your choices, such as why they made it to your list? Also if you can include the authors it helps.

    GG>>>Interesting choice but for some reason this does not suprise me based on your on line personality... I am looking forward to meeting you one day...at a get-together perhaps...

    JacknJill>>> another classic of a different genre, been a long time since I picked that one up (probably because one of my EXs has my copy!)

    One I would like to re-read is Hitchhikers Guide...I just saw the film on satelite and it made me realise how long it has been since I read the book...


    Ronnie,
    Naughtylady
    They will forget what you said,
    they will forget what you did,
    but they will never forget the way you made them feel.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by naughtylady

    GG>>>Interesting choice but for some reason this does not suprise me based on your on line personality... I am looking forward to meeting you one day...at a get-together perhaps...

    Ronnie,
    Naughtylady

    Ronnie,

    Any time darling! Basically, I love books that describe the 'human condition.' Another classic is Catch-22 by Joseph Heller (I have read it many times over):

    "Do you know how long a year takes when it's going away?" Dunbar repeated to Clevinger. "This long." He snapped his fingers. "A second ago you were stepping into college with your lungs full of fresh air. Today you're an old man."

    "Old?" asked Clevinger with surprise. "What are you talking about?"

    "Old."

    "I'm not old."

    "You're inches away from death every time you go on a mission. How much older can you be at your age? A half minute before that you were stepping into high school, and an unhooked brassiere was as close as you ever hoped to get to Paradise. Only a fifth of a second before that you were a small kid with a ten-week summer vacation that lasted a hundred thousand years and still ended too soon. Zip! They go rocketing by so fast. How the hell else are you ever going to slow down?" Dunbar was almost angry when he finished.

    "Well, maybe it is true," Clevinger conceded unwillingly in a subdued tone. "Maybe a long life does have to be filled with many unpleasant conditions if it's to seem long. But in that event, who wants one?"

    "I do," Dunbar told him.

    "Why?" Clevinger asked.

    "What else is there?"

    --from Catch-22

  6. #6
    "The Wanderers" by Richard Price
    "The Favourite Game" by Leonard Cohen
    "Going Down Slow" by John Metcalf
    "Fast Times at Ridgmont High" by Cameron Crowe
    "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    "The Big Sleep" by Raymond Chandler
    Anything and Everything by Henry Miller

  7. #7
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    I'm currently reading a historical fiction novel called Battle Royale by Koushun Takami

    It is set in a version of Japan where they never really recovered after the war and fell under an isolationist dictatorship and is about a class of junior high school students who are kidnapped, taken to a deserted island, given weapons and rations and forced to kill one another within 3 days until there is only one left alive as part of a military program.

    It is extremely violent and descriptive in it's violence but it's not gratuitous and does a really good job of briniging depth to the various students. It was a best seller in Japan after the controversy died down and people actualy sat down and read it and it spawned 2 movies of the same name as well as a series of graphic novels.
    Last edited by Gee; 03-31-2006 at 04:51 AM.
    Inherited Will, the destiny of an age and the dreams of its people. These things will not be stopped.
    As long as people continue to pursue the meaning of freedom. They will never cease to be.

  8. #8

    Ah!

    No secret for anyone ...
    The Wonderfull Wizard of Oz witch a have a original copy of ...
    Even if my favorite author is Agatha Christie, a very remarquable woman, I did also appreciate a lot '' Le meilleur des mondes '' version from Aldous Huxley.
    Dorothy
    The Wizard of Oz
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  9. #9
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    GG, Catch-22 is one of the all time greats. I love it when he says, "They're trying to kill me," as if the war is personal...I love the way Heller saw the world.
    Fight Club is probably the best satirical novel of the 90s. Too bad Palahniuk never came close to this level again.
    I thought Ed Norton did an amazing job in the movie, too. All the more impressive for a guy who doesn't look the part physically.

    Rudy Rucker is one of the most creative Sci-fi writers ever.

    A Farewell to Arms...it's a wonder to me Hemingway didn't kill himself sooner writing stuff like that.

    Or, if you want a really dark novel, 'The Long Walk,' by Stephen King, written under the name Richard Bachman. IMHO, by far the most chilling book King ever wrote. I'm a slow reader and I went through it in one afternoon.
    Why are homely people discriminated against...we're the majority

  10. #10
    - Anything by Hemingway

    - The books by James Clavell (Noble House, King Rat, Tai Pan, Shogun, Whirlwind, Gai Jin).

    - Thayer's Life of Beethoven. You have to be a real Beethoven fan (I am!) to go through this tome. There is one very compelling story in there where a friend of his miscarries, and he sends her a note asking her to visit him. When she arrives he says nothing, but sits down and plays piano for her - he was awkward with words - she understood that this was his way of expressing sympathy.

    - Perhaps we need to start a music thread too, but please, no rap (I consider it alternative entertainment, not music)

  11. #11
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    "For anything you gain, you lose something"

    Ronnie, may I suggest you an amazing, full of insights, book:

    "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance", by Robert Pirsig. It is about a motorcycle journey across the United States. But it is not really about motorcycles neither it is about USA.

    Actually, I would love to see if one can develop a ZEN-view of escorting. I wonder if a woman practicing ecorting can become a Zen master...

    Elvis

  12. #12
    If you are looking for light summer reading and enjoy "polar" (crime/detective novels), I'd recommend Swedish author Henning Mankell. His books are now being translated all over the world and they are selling like hot cakes. Thru word of mouth, there's hardly anyone I know that has not read at least one of his novels. They are well written, the central character (Inspector Kurt Wallander) is flawed and fascinating, and since they are set in Sweden, they provide a refreshing change in scenery. Here's an extremely complete site with tons of info on the author, the books and even the tv/film adaptations. You read one of these novels and you're hooked!

    http://www.inspector-wallander.org/

  13. #13
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    What a great thread! If I do say so myself


    Ronnie,
    Naughtylady
    They will forget what you said,
    they will forget what you did,
    but they will never forget the way you made them feel.

  14. #14
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    now now Ronnie, you shouldn't toot your own horn, you have you clients for that. ;p
    Inherited Will, the destiny of an age and the dreams of its people. These things will not be stopped.
    As long as people continue to pursue the meaning of freedom. They will never cease to be.

  15. #15
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    I am obviously not the only bibliophile out here...

    I am quite certain that there are others who are making notes about which books to read this summer...

    Ronnie,
    Naughtylady
    They will forget what you said,
    they will forget what you did,
    but they will never forget the way you made them feel.

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