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Thread: Learning French: How necessary is it?

  1. #1

    Learning French: How necessary is it?

    I was thinking that it may be useful to become fluent in French for Montreal trips. I get by OK with Englsh, but there's scenarios like Francophone-only SPs, exploring non-tourist areas, etc. Unfortunately, the last time I took French was in the 8th grade!

    There's a community college in my state which offers non-credit French courses for $140/semester. And there is the Rosetta Stone package (French I and II) for $330. I prefer instructor-led courses though.

    Would it be worth the money and effort to do this? How long does it take to become conversationally fluent? Any recommendations on the best way to learn? Thanks.

  2. #2

    The language of love

    Absolutely, the ladies will love you for making an effort. I personally also want to learn Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Russian, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukranian, and last but not least, Swedish!

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by bond_james_bond

    There's a community college in my state which offers non-credit French courses for $140/semester. And there is the Rosetta Stone package (French I and II) for $330. I prefer instructor-led courses though.

    Would it be worth the money and effort to do this? How long does it take to become conversationally fluent? Any recommendations on the best way to learn? Thanks.
    Go with the Rosetta Stone. Pop the CD in your car and play it on the way to work every day. I'm not sure where you live but big cities also have Alliance Francaise. I don't necessarily recommend that you go to every one of their events but it's a great opportunity to meet native French speakers as well as getting referrals for a personal French tutor. Also, keep in mind that the French that you'll be learning in the States is not exactly the same as Quebecois French which will sound a lot more rapid-fire. Good luck.
    A demander: une cochonne Quebecoise ou Allemande avec qui le sol se derobe sous mes pieds!

  4. #4
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    I spoke French for the first time in Montreal in summer 2003 when I came to watch some baseball. I was hooked from the first words I ever said in the metro "oon cart tooreesteek see voo play" (une cart touristique si'l vous plaît) and I actually got a 3 day tourist pass for the metro. I'm almost done w/ a second semester course now and will continue in the fall. Some people are better in a classroom setting, some are better with just living and picking it up. I'm good with a combination of both,especially since I cant always be in Montreal or France. Nothing beats travelling to Montreal and after a day or so of not hearing English, joining right in. Also, alcohol helps, it lowers your inhibitions so your not self consious when trying to pronounce. It might be helpful just to find the most francophone bar you can find and have some drinks at happy hour and strike up conversations with people.

    Rosetta Stone sounds like the Pimsuleur program that I listen to. CD only, no book, you listen and repeat. It has helped my pronunciation immensly.
    Last edited by Jaxon; 04-26-2006 at 01:54 AM.

  5. #5
    You'll definitively gain something by learning french. You always gain something by learning: more culture, which is good (At least it used to be). You dont loose anything, except time, which that is up to how you spend your free time.

    You'll be able to appreciate a little more about the Montreal franco culture, which in many people's opinion is more interesting than the anglo scene...

    Of course, let's be realistic, learning french is not like learning english, it takes a little work.

    And it will be worth it if you can make friends or wingmans that speak french so you can really explore the franco world, and also, to practice...

  6. #6
    Wine, women, & song ... ck_nj's Avatar
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    I found learning French to be very beneficial for my Montreal trips, both business and vacation.
    It made me more comfortable talking to people, and just visiting the city in general. It was also easy for me to learn because I already know Spanish from school, and it was easier to adapt since they are both Latin-based languages.
    I found that people in Montreal (especially women ) opened up to me more when I try to speak French.

    So Mr. Bond, you made a good choice to learn.

    CK
    Last edited by ck_nj; 04-26-2006 at 01:03 PM.
    Clark
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    SERGEANT: Like a big blue bird....with bright red boots! Why don't you take the rest of the night off now, Mooney. Go back to Murphy's bar and finish what you plainly started. I'll be off myself in a bit and join ya there...

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