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Thread: Wireless Network

  1. #1
    Registered User
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    Wireless Network

    Hypothetically speaking, if I were to borrow my neighbors wireless network signal, would they be able to detect that my computer is on their network?

    If so, how would I be able to make my computer invisible?

    Of course I would never do a thing like that....


    Looking forward to your replies!

    The Don
    "Just When I Thought I Was Out.....They Pull Me Back In!!!"

  2. #2
    You give Love..A BAD NAME
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDon
    Hypothetically speaking, if I were to borrow my neighbors wireless network signal, would they be able to detect that my computer is on their network?

    If so, how would I be able to make my computer invisible?

    Of course I would never do a thing like that....


    Looking forward to your replies!

    The Don

    just my 2 Cents.............

    "Of course I would never do a thing like that....

    THEN why Ask.......

    yes this maybe possible, depending upon the Network Setup (is it Secure, if it is, then Good Luck)

    ok, when I setup my Home Wireless Network:
    I used a Unique Network Name (SSID = Service Set Identifier;Each SSID can be up to 32 Characters; The SSID maybe Visible to Others)
    I used a Unique Pass Phrase
    I used a Unique Network Key (26 Characters long, both alpha/numeric)
    My Network is set for WEP = Wired Equivalent Privacy (a form of Data Encryption)

    Thanks !

    __________________________________________________________


    ***hypothesis - 1). a proposition assumed as a premise in an argument
    2). the antecedent of a conditional proposition
    3). a mere assumption or guess***

  3. #3
    Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDon
    Hypothetically speaking, if I were to borrow my neighbors wireless network signal, would they be able to detect that my computer is on their network?

    If so, how would I be able to make my computer invisible?

    Of course I would never do a thing like that....


    Looking forward to your replies!

    The Don
    You cant really make your computer invisible because into the router you can see all active connections. Also form his pc its possible to see you into networking even if you don't have the same network name. Make sure your hard drive is not shared btw Also if you live in an appartment building there no such way he can find its you or another one living around. If he's enough stupid to not lock his wireless network he worth to get it stolen

    Wilko

  4. #4

    And remember

    If you connect to his router/network, and if he knows what he's doing, he can monitor, even sniff your traffic.

  5. #5
    gallantca, if the person knew what he was doing, you would never be able to connect to his router to begin with. I wouldn't worry about a person with an unsecured router being a threat to your surfing habits. If you're worried about him detecting your presence by logging into his router to see the activity, just log into it and change the admin user name and password. Then he won't be able to check anything unless he does a hard reset on the router.

    Of course, no one would ever do that.....

  6. #6

    Honeypot

    Quote Originally Posted by Techman
    gallantca, if the person knew what he was doing, you would never be able to connect to his router to begin with. I wouldn't worry about a person with an unsecured router being a threat :
    It's called a honeypot and it's more common than one may think.

  7. #7
    I'm aware of what a honeypot is. Basically anyone sending confidential info over someone else's internet connection deserves to get burned. The same way anyone with an unsecured wireless network deserves it. You might as well write your credit card info on a bathroom wall.

  8. #8

    2 routers

    I have 2 wireless routers set up in my place. As a test, I left 1 completely open just to see what I could do with it and you wouldn't believe what I "read" in terms of people "stealing" my wireless internet connection. I was able to read e-mail messages, unencrypted passwords, the webpages they were going to, etc. from these people.

    When I connect to a free hotspot, a wired network with my laptop (such as in a hotel) or an unprotected wireless network, I go through a secure SSH tunnel. It is as safe for me to use a free hotspot as it is for me to be surfing at home.

  9. #9
    On a somewhat similar note, there are dangers to using a computer in an internet cafe. It is one thing to use your own computer. It is another thing to use someone else's computer to do things.

    In my case, I installed the software on my computers and I know what exactly is installed on them. On an internet cafe computer, you have no means of knowing what is installed on the computer. An unscrupulous owner/employee can install keystroke logging software on the computer and any information you type is captured and optained/used later on.

    Going through an SSH tunnel will not help you in the case of keystroke logging software.
    Last edited by jacep; 09-04-2006 at 09:29 PM.

  10. #10

    question for jim

    Quote Originally Posted by jim-ce
    I go through a secure SSH tunnel. It is as safe for me to use a free hotspot as it is for me to be surfing at home.
    Do you use a proxy over SSH or do the equivalent of a remote desktop to another machine ?

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by gallantca
    Do you use a proxy over SSH or do the equivalent of a remote desktop to another machine ?
    I used to have only a secure private network remote desktop set up but a few places I went to for work purposes did not allow direct outside connections of this type.

    Most places where I work (I'm an independant IT contractor) allow for SSH connections (port 22) so I installed an SSH server at home with an http/https proxy server. I believe that the free wi-fi in Montreal also allows for SSH connections.

    This allows me to open only 1 port on my router (port 22) using specific time/date rules (My d-link router has a schedule feature built-in). Once I connect through SSH to my home server pc with certain tunnels specified (local/source port forwarding), I configure my internet proxy server settings on my local machine to point to my server machine's internal 192 IP address at home and I'm able browse the internet as easily and securely as if I was at home.

    This allows me to browse the internet securely as well as having my browsing, chatting, etc. habits not being monitored. It also allows me to go through websites that are "blocked" by whatever company/place that my computer is connected to. Anyone monitoring my internet connection would only see that I established an SSH connection to my machine at home. They would have no idea of what I'm transmitting back/forth because the traffic is entirely encrypted. They wouldn't even know what webpages I viewed and what messages I typed in terms of IM chatting since I'm not using THEIR web proxy server for my connection.

    I now exclusively use the SSH set-up because I consider my SSH set-up to be more secure than my regular private network remote desktop set-up. I also only have the SSH port open on my router and not the Remote Desktop port. I might still use Remote Desktop but now I go through my SSH tunnel.

  12. #12
    Most manufacturers seem to prefer the ease of use criterion at the price of security.
    It's understandable considering that most home computer users are the same people who don't know how to set the clock on their vcr. Computers have become home appliances, unfortunately they are a little more complicated than a toaster or a playstation.

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