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Thread: What does it take to make a good slap shot in hockey?

  1. #1
    proud infidel
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    Question What does it take to make a good slap shot in hockey?

    Anybody know what the secret is behind having a good slap shot in hockey? I've been trying for years to make the damn puck rise, but have nearly always failed . Anyone have any tips? What is it that makes a slap shot great compared to one that's just ordinary? Why do guys like Sheldon Surray and Rob Blake, for instance, have great slap shots? Is it purely a question of upper body strength or is there a real technique to it? Should one try to hit the ice with the stick just before striking the puck as in golf when one tries an approach shot while attempting to create backspin? Or should one try to hit the puck and the ice simultaneously instead? And is it necessary to try to incorporate a twist of the wrist upon striking the puck in order to make the puck rise, or should the shot be made with the blade hitting the puck squarely?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by femaleluver2; 02-26-2007 at 10:08 PM.
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  2. #2
    proud infidel
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    N.B. please disregard the above golf analogy as it doesn't make sense
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  3. #3
    Don't redirect any questions or criticisms towards me I never mastered a slapshot myself, nor have I even laced skates in the last 4 or 5 years! I am simply re-posting this from Wikipedia:Slapshot

    A slap shot in ice hockey is the hardest shot. It has four stages which are executed in one fluid motion:

    1. The player winds up his hockey stick by raising it behind his body, sometimes raising the blade to shoulder height or higher.
    2. Next the player violently "slaps" the ice slightly behind the puck and uses his or her weight to bend the stick, storing energy in it like a spring. It is this bending of the stick that gives the slapshot its amazing speed. Just like a bow and arrow, the stick's desire to return to being straight is transferred to the puck, giving it much more speed than just hitting it alone could do.
    3. When the face of the stick blade strikes the puck, the player rolls his or her wrists and shifts his or her weight so that the energy stored in the stick is released through the puck.
    4. Finally, the player follows through, ending up with the stick pointed towards the desired target.
    Amantes sunt amentes.

  4. #4
    proud infidel
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    Thumbs down

    great info guys, thanks!
    fml

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