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Thread: Winter tire law

  1. #1

    Winter tire law

    Can someone confirm the rumor I heard about how the law was

    recently changed? Winter tires are now only mandatory dec 15 -

    march 15 instead of november 15 - april 15.

    Thx

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by master_bates
    Can someone confirm the rumor I heard about how the law was

    recently changed? Winter tires are now only mandatory dec 15 -

    march 15 instead of november 15 - april 15.

    Thx
    That's indeed the new mandatory winter period under the current law project...it's not a law yet as they are still working on the definition of what a snow tire is...

    Lion Heart

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lion Heart
    That's indeed the new mandatory winter period under the current law project...it's not a law yet as they are still working on the definition of what a snow tire is...
    Lion Heart
    Lion Heart, is winter going to cooperate with the law? Did anyone tell Mother Nature that there is not to be any snow in Montreal before December 15 or after March 15? What was her response and does she approve of this law?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by EagerBeaver
    Lion Heart, is winter going to cooperate with the law? Did anyone tell Mother Nature that there is not to be any snow in Montreal before December 15 or after March 15? What was her response and does she approve of this law?
    Winter start dec. 21 snow or not.What people call snowtire are winter tire made for snow and cold temperature.Better traction , handling, and braking power on cold or icy pavement. It is a law that make sense

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by master_bates
    Winter tires are now only mandatory dec 15 - march 15
    Yes. http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/pag...on_pneus_hiver



    Quote Originally Posted by Lion Heart
    it's not a law yet as they are still working on the definition of what a snow tire is...
    Law is in effect now, and a definition of winter tire is in effect. (see link above)


    Quote Originally Posted by EagerBeaver
    Lion Heart, is winter going to cooperate with the law?
    The law is a minimum. You can of course drive with winter tires all year long if you want. Before this date, 4 season tires were allowed all year.

  6. #6
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    Cars plated outside of Québec don't have to follow this regulation so, no problems for visitors.

    EB, you should know better... With a law, any law, a line need to be drawn somewhere. This Dec 15th date relates to the time, in average, where temperature stay below -10C (4 seasons useless below about -7C) and to the average date where there's a durable snow cover. This is also to minimise wear on winter tires since these are made with a softer compound and tend to "melt" when used in higher temperature.

    Driving with winter tires 365 day/year isn't a good idea. Winter tires have a lesser road handling on dry hot pavement than good quality summer tire, mainly because of the depth of the thread that make them more "wobbly" and because there's usually less thread in contact with the road, due to the pattern of the thread. On top of that, since they wear too fast in summer, it's a waste of money.

  7. #7
    Thanks for the link Kepler

    The majority of the cold and snow falls within december and march so it

    makes more sense instead of starting in november till april.

  8. #8
    I support this law but considering how little I use my car, especially in winter, it kindda sucks to have to spend $800for winter tires...

    So I'm looking for used P185/60 R14

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JustBob
    I support this law but considering how little I use my car, especially in winter, it kindda sucks to have to spend $800for winter tires...

    So I'm looking for used P185/60 R14
    Go shopping try pneu du president, canadian tire, or tirerack.com you ca get snow tire for $400 and less
    Last edited by voyageur11; 10-22-2008 at 03:27 PM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mazingerz
    Encore trop de laisser-aller je trouve. Quand les visiteurs viennent chez nous, ils font face aux mêmes conditions routière que je sache. Pourquoi eux autres devraient avoir droit de se soustraire à la loi et de risquer nos vies?
    Parce qu'ils amènent de l'argent (nous espérons). Heureusement, il n'y a pas beaucoup de conducteurs venant de l'Alabama en voiture l'hiver.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mazingerz
    Encore trop de laisser-aller je trouve. Quand les visiteurs viennent chez nous, ils font face aux mêmes conditions routière que je sache. Pourquoi eux autres devraient avoir droit de se soustraire à la loi et de risquer nos vies?
    Pcqu'ils viennent pour qq jours ou une ou deux semaines. Qu'est-ce que tu veux qu'on fasse? Qu'ils mettent des pneus d'hivers pour 3 jours passés à MTL? Ben voyons!

    Si tu vas en Ontario, est-ce que tu vas mettre une plaque d'immatriculation en avant de ton auto pour respecter leur loi? Ben non, pcq tu viens du Qc et que tu ne vas y passer que qq jours, alors la loi ne s'applique pas à toi.
    MG

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by metoo4
    EB, you should know better... With a law, any law, a line need to be drawn somewhere.
    You're right - I should know better and I do. I am intimately familiar with motor vehicle laws in my own jurisdiction and basically they are all enacted as a means of regulating safety on the highways. I should note that in Connecticut, there is no law requiring winter tires at any time. I suspect that this is largely due to the fact that we do not get as much snow as you do in Montreal, except perhaps for the far northwestern corner of the state, which is not densely populated nor is there a lot of highway traffic there.

    You are correct that the law must draw the line somewhere. But usually, legislation that is safety based and passed by any legislature (or parliament in your case) is based on objective studies of accidents and weather done on a monthly basis. In this case, there have probably been studies done by month showing both the number of accidents due to slippage from not driving on snow tires, and studies done by month on average snowfall in Montreal. Which is why I am VERY surprised that this law would use either November 15 or December 15 as a trigger date, instead of November 1 or December 1 or January 1. All such studies I am aware of, are usually done on a monthly basis or for the calendar month.

    Of course, I am merely assuming that legislation in Quebec is formulated in the same manner, but I would think this to be a reasonable assumption on my part.
    Last edited by EagerBeaver; 10-22-2008 at 05:04 PM.

  13. #13
    The reason is before the dec. 15 . usually the snow will melt in a few days because de ground is not frozen.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by voyageur11
    The reason is before the dec. 15 . usually the snow will melt in a few days because de ground is not frozen.
    It's been mentionned before in this thread, but the benefit of the winter tires and the dates chosen have more to do with the temperature then the amount of snow.
    MG

  15. #15
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    v11, MG Mtl,

    There is likely some scientific truth to what you say. I have on many occasions seen snowfall and rainfall studies used in Court cases involving slip and fall personal injury cases. In the case of snowfall studies, in slip and fall cases, they are usually used in conjunction with temperature studies. I remember a case involving a UPS deliveryman who slipped and fell on an icy driveway. We retrieved the snowfall records for the week in question and the temperature records as well. These records proved that there had been a snowfall the day before he slipped and fell of about 2", the snow had melted when the temperature climbed later in the day, and then froze the following night before his unfortunate fall early the following morning.

    I had been thinking only in terms of monthly studies of snowfall but I had forgotten in my prior post that in slippage cases (people or cars!), temperature is an enormous factor especially when snow melts and freezes. Therefore, it would make sense to perhaps break it down by week and certainly with respect to temperature, the Celsius studies are probably available on a weekly basis.

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