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Thread: A Disgusting Lack of Patriotism

  1. #1

    A Disgusting Lack of Patriotism

    Do Montrealers not celebrate Canada Day? I live on an extremely busy street, Saint-Denis Street, and yesterday, I did not see one Canadian flag or an inkling of National spirit or pride on the streets of my neighborhood.

    Also, I was watching the festivities in Ottawa on the tele, and when the Governor General arrived and "God Save the Queen" was playing, a group of ornery Frenchmen (baby boomers oddly enough) started cursing and demanded I turn off our "Royal Anthem" on Canada Day!

    Because I live in a borough, The Plateau Mount Royal, which is apparently separate from Montreal, local festivities usually take place at one of the parks instead of having to travel all the way Downtown. Last night however there was absolutely nothing going on at any of them.

    A couple of distant sparks adorned the skyline when the sun fell, but the show was hardly worthy of Canada's 142nd birthday; it paled in comparison to the fireworks competition.

    I have seen larger Dominion Day celebrations in cities that have less half a million people and more spirited ones in villages not much bigger than a couple city blocks.

    We live in a nation afforded the luxuries and freedoms that others fight their entire lives to obtain. From coast to coast to coast we are free to practice any religion, preach any politics, and freely express ourselves. Capitalism flourishes in tandem with socialism in our society and we do our best to take care those less fortunate. Generally, we are a very tolerant people accepting of other cultures and that which is different. Internationally we are a talisman of peaceful mediation and humanitarianism. If that's not reason enough to celebrate on Canada Day, I'm not sure what is. For shame Montreal, for shame.

    Ocoq

    Lonely Patriot in the Plateau

  2. #2
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    Lack of patriotism and disgusting....for me that's an oxymoron.

    I'm not Canadian nor Québécois even if de facto I was born here, in Montreal, from a French Canadian family. The question is this: do I have to feel Canadian or Québécois because of this? What does it mean to be «Canadian» or «Québécois»? What does a Newfie have in common with a redneck from the Prairies? A Montrealer with a person living in Victoria? This is BS. There no common bonds beyond a silly flag, a schmaltzy national anthem and a stupid beaver.

    I consider myself a citizen of the world and I'm happy with that. Anyways, what does it means today to ha ve a «cultural identity»? We live in a «liquid modernity» (dixit Zygmut Bauman) and a «postmodern society» where the «proper» mingles with the Other.

    I hate banners, flags, linguistic and ethnic barriers...these are concepts of another age.
    Last edited by protagoras; 07-02-2009 at 10:48 AM.
    ἄνθρωπος μέτρον
    Man is the measure of all things

    Sexo sin pecado es como huevo sin sal (Le sexe sans péché est comme un œuf sans sel/Sex without sin is like an egg without salt) [Carlos Fuentes]

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ocoq
    Do Montrealers not celebrate Canada Day? I live on an extremely busy street, Saint-Denis Street, and yesterday, I did not see one Canadian flag or an inkling of National spirit or pride on the streets of my neighborhood.

    Also, I was watching the festivities in Ottawa on the tele, and when the Governor General arrived and "God Save the Queen" was playing, a group of ornery Frenchmen (baby boomers oddly enough) started cursing and demanded I turn off our "Royal Anthem" on Canada Day!

    Because I live in a borough, The Plateau Mount Royal, which is apparently separate from Montreal, local festivities usually take place at one of the parks instead of having to travel all the way Downtown. Last night however there was absolutely nothing going on at any of them.

    A couple of distant sparks adorned the skyline when the sun fell, but the show was hardly worthy of Canada's 142nd birthday; it paled in comparison to the fireworks competition.

    I have seen larger Dominion Day celebrations in cities that have less half a million people and more spirited ones in villages not much bigger than a couple city blocks.

    We live in a nation afforded the luxuries and freedoms that others fight their entire lives to obtain. From coast to coast to coast we are free to practice any religion, preach any politics, and freely express ourselves. Capitalism flourishes in tandem with socialism in our society and we do our best to take care those less fortunate. Generally, we are a very tolerant people accepting of other cultures and that which is different. Internationally we are a talisman of peaceful mediation and humanitarianism. If that's not reason enough to celebrate on Canada Day, I'm not sure what is. For shame Montreal, for shame.

    Ocoq

    Lonely Patriot in the Plateau

    Welcome to Quebec.

    Actually, I've been studying the history of the plains of Abraham lately. For me, it helps to understand some of the feelings.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by protagoras
    Lack of patriotism and disgusting....for me that's an oxymoron.

    I'm not Canadian nor Québécois. I consider myself a citizen of the world and I'm happy with that. Anyways, what does it means today to ha ve a «cultural identity»? We live in a «liquid modernity» (dixit Zygmut Bauman) and a «postmodern society» where the «proper» mingles with the Other.

    I hate banners, flags, linguistic and ethnic barriers...these are concepts of another age.
    Yes, I agree.

    Imagine there's no countries
    It isn't hard to do
    Nothing to kill or die for
    And no religion too
    Imagine all the people
    Living life in peace...


    ... John Lennon

  5. #5
    Do you think waving a silly piece of cloth or listening to some silly song makes you patriotic?

    If you want to be patriotic, you go to work, obey the laws, be courteous and helpful to neighbours and strangers alike, keep your house and yard clean, don't throw trash on the sidewalks, pay your taxes, get involved in public affairs that concern you, and allow your neighbours the peaceable enjoyment of the holidays that kick off the summer.

  6. #6
    It is sort of sad that people totally ignore it in Quebec, although this is not new. While blind patiotism is never a good thing I don't totally buy the Austin Powers "International Man of Mystery", citizen of the world schtick either.

    A little bit of pride is ok and a reason to celebrate and have fun with your fellow citizens and neighbours is always ok.

  7. #7
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    If you are canadian and you travel to quebec and you want to be patriotic you should always book an sp. When you leave she will spend the money and this helps the economy by creating jobs, this is what patriotism is all about. I always try and do my part when i am in montreal

  8. #8
    I was born in Montreal, but because of the threat of separation I lived in Ontario and California for many years of my early life. I was always back in Montreal at times for school or vsiting relatives.
    I remember back in my university days that english speaking people had their bars to drink at and when I went to a french bar I got the evil eye for speaking english. On the streets of Montreal I have been told many times that I should speak french because this is Quebec. Years ago to have a Canadian flag sticker on your car or to fly a Canadian flag outside your house would mean that you windows might be broken.
    Thank God that the people have wised up and realized that we all live in a one economy world. No longer are the french elite controlling the minds of the people. Recently Jauque Parzeau suggested that crissis after crissis be manufactured to acheive Quebec independance. No one fell for it, the cost would be enormous for Quebec. We live in a city that has low housing prices and is not traffic congested. We can thank Rene Levesque for this. We have paid the price for this by having all the large head offices move down the 401 to the GTA ( Greater Toronto Area )

  9. #9

    Questions for Ocoq

    What was your neighbourhood like one week earlier?
    Were there celebrations and fireworks, etc for St. Jean Baptiste Day?
    And just out of curiosity, how long have you lived in Montreal?

  10. #10
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    "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel." - Dr. Samuel Johnson

    "In Dr. Johnson's famous dictionary patriotism is defined as the last resort of a scoundrel. With all due respect to an enlightened but inferior lexicographer I beg to submit that it is the first." - Ambrose Bierce
    The mounties always get their man.

  11. #11
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    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by johnhenrygalt
    Do you think waving a silly piece of cloth or listening to some silly song makes you patriotic?

    If you want to be patriotic, you go to work, obey the laws, be courteous and helpful to neighbours and strangers alike, keep your house and yard clean, don't throw trash on the sidewalks, pay your taxes, get involved in public affairs that concern you, and allow your neighbours the peaceable enjoyment of the holidays that kick off the summer.

    For me this is more «civism» than «patriotism». Unfortunately, I should say that in general Québécois are not prone to keep their cities clean. Just take a look in front of buildings in Montréal: cigarettes stubs laying all over the place. This is not to mention the alleys that are full of garbage. Only in Montréal...welcome to my city!!!!!

    The picture is totally different in most cities abroad. For example, in São Paulo (a city of 22,000,000 inhabitants) the streets are clean!!!! (There are exception in the favelas however but here we speak opf extreme poverty). I'm eager to go back there soon because they implemented recently (something like last week I think) a new rule prohibiting smoking in plublic places. Will it be the same thing as in Montréal: sidewalks full of stubs? I don't know yet but I'm curious to see how thry will manage that problem.

    São Paulo was voted, in 2007, the most corteous city of the world. No wonder that Montreal never received that award....


    I'm actually unable to find on the Net the result of that pool. I found a similar pool and Montreal is among the bad cities while Toronto is one of the best. I should also add that we should not take theses pools as bona fide representation of what is really going on in a city. Take New York for exampler. While New York is described as the city the most corteous in the world there's another pool (on the page of results for my query on Google) telling me that New Yorkers are the rudest drivers in the State. There's nothing to undertand in these pools...


    http://www.readersdigest.ca/mag/2006/07/polite.php
    Last edited by protagoras; 07-02-2009 at 12:12 PM.
    ἄνθρωπος μέτρον
    Man is the measure of all things

    Sexo sin pecado es como huevo sin sal (Le sexe sans péché est comme un œuf sans sel/Sex without sin is like an egg without salt) [Carlos Fuentes]

  12. #12
    I didnt take time to read tru all post but let me reminds you that it was right in the middle of a week.

    my 2 cents

  13. #13
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    People celebrate on June 24 the quebec st-jean, so when it comes to july 1st only 1 week later, they don't care much, for everybody the 4th of july version for us is june 24, and july 1st is just the day to help move friends if needed or take the day off because somebody decided it was a free day... thats it. I never did anything exept moving people on that day, and i don't plan i will.
    Life is a party ! Death is the Hangover.. 70-49-6

  14. #14
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    My dear Ocoq, I am afraid you picked the wrong neighborhood to live in.

    Le Plateau is mostly French and "souverainist". Of course, you will not see big celebrations there on Canada Day! You should have come a bit more south : That's where I live and I could hear festivities from my house!

    Personally, I am not a patriot and do not wish to become one. Patriotism can lead to blind idiocy (just look at most wars!). I think Canada is a great country but so are many other countries. I feel that my duty as a French Canadian is to be a good citizen. This is how I show respect to my nation. I agree with johnhenrygalt.
    "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." - Anaïs Nin

  15. #15
    Originally Posted by HG Hunter

    What was your neighbourhood like one week earlier?
    Were there celebrations and fireworks, etc for St. Jean Baptiste Day?
    And just out of curiosity, how long have you lived in Montreal?
    I lived in Old Montreal for a couple months but wanted something bigger for the same price so I moved to a slummy neighborhood (Plateau Mount Royal) in June. I've been in town for a few months now. My loft faces the mountain, and I saw many fireworks on St. Jean Baptiste Day (and there were more facing the river as well).

    Well I will admit blind patriotism/nationalism/etc. perhaps is not the best of things, and I am not type to go jumping off bridges if my friends do, as it were.

    To all the naysayers, particularly that Protagoras chap, I firmly believe that there is nothing wrong with love of one's country. Many of you seem to be confusing fanaticism with patriotism; there is no harm in waving your colors, whichever colors they may be, if you do so with diligence. You may think I am a nutter, but I will continue to wave my flag and wear my heart on my sleeve.

    Bonne Fête/Confédération Canada and God Save the Queen!

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