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Thread: Finger Herpes

  1. #1

    Finger Herpes

    If, like me, you've enjoyed venturing a finger or two into some stripper's muff, then you might be a little perturbed by this: http://www.skinsight.com/adult/herpeticWhitlow.htm

    Anyone know where I can buy a jumbo sized pack of latex gloves?

  2. #2
    I could be wrong, but isn't a simple wart on a finger also some form of herpese.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    If, like me, you've enjoyed venturing a finger or two into some stripper's muff, then you might be a little perturbed by this: http://www.skinsight.com/adult/herpeticWhitlow.htm

    Anyone know where I can buy a jumbo sized pack of latex gloves?
    Rod,

    Finger HERPES is more common than you think. This can be spread to other areas ie: eyes, mouth, nose and the genitals/anus from the infected fingers.


    DA_

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Jones View Post
    I could be wrong, but isn't a simple wart on a finger also some form of herpese.
    Herpes is not warts. Warts are HPV. human papillomavirus

    Herpes is HSV 1 and HSV 2. Human Simplex Virus 1 and 2.

    HSV Type 2 is more common around the genitals, but either can appear at any place on your skin.

    Herpes 1 is very common. Most people have had HSV 1. The virus may die off or it may go into your nervous system and hide and attack at a later date. Compromised immune systems are usually behind very bad cases of the Herpes virus.

    Herpes forms blisters on your skin. It is very contagious. The blisters break open and heal in time.

    Warts are solid. The difference between the genital type and the other types is that genital type tend to grow around the genitals. There are over 200 types of human papillomavirus. About 2 dozen are associated with the genitals. Most are not high risk for causing cancer. But the ones that are cause most of the cervical, vaginal and rectum cancers.

  5. #5
    The info provided in this thread would be very useful as a future reference. Would the mods consider moving this thread to the Health Info section?

  6. #6
    thats so weird i swear i saw someone today that had that

  7. #7
    wait. i got a question

    can you get finger herpes for fingering a vagina?...

  8. #8
    Interesting article from the Public Health Agency in Canada points out that HSAV is not a reportable STD in Canada:

    http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cjhs/cjhs5-eng.php

    Here's a portion for those that don't want to read the entire article:
    Epidemiology of Genital HSV in Canada
    Since HSV infection is not a reportable STD in Canada, we have limited knowledge of the epidemiology of genital herpes and of the seroprevalence of HSV-2. In a currently unpublished study, Sacks and colleagues used Western blot analysis to determine HSV-2 seroprevalence in a randomized sample of 409 women in labour in a Vancouver hospital between May 1985 and February 1987 (Sacks & Garland, personal communication). Interview data made it possible to draw an association between lifetime number of sexual partners and HSV-2 seropositivity which showed, for example, that women who reported 6-10 partners were over 7 times more likely to be seropositive for HSV-2 (33.3%) than those who reported 1 partner (4.6%), and that 55% of women with more than 10 partners (about 10% of the sample) were seropositive (Table 2). Overall, 20% of women in this "average risk" sample of low to middle class women in Vancouver were seropositive for HSV-2.
    Given that a sizeable proportion of young adults in Canada have had 3-5, or more, partners by the time they are 20 years old (for review see Maticka-Tyndale, 1997), and that the number of partners increases with age, we hypothesize that the prevalence of HSV-2 infection in Canada at least parallels that in the mid-range countries identified in Table 1. For example, a Swedish study of 14-15 year old young women found that 0.4% were HSV-2 seropositive; 15 years later, the number was 22% for the same sample (Christenson et al., 1993). In the mid-1980s, HSV-2 seroprevalence in pregnant Swedish women was 27.9% vs. 25.3-34.9% in pregnant Caucasian women in the U.S (see Kroon, 1994). Although these percentages suggest a possible range for the current overall HSV-2 seroprevalence in Canada, the discussion below on risk factors for genital herpes and HSV-2 infection (see Table 3) makes it clear that some sub-groups within the population carry an elevated burden of risk.

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