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Thread: It's good to be green

  1. #1
    and never surrender
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    trawna
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    72

    It's good to be green

    If everyone did a little energy conservation, it could result in a fairly significant savings.

    I replaced 30 bulbs of varying wattage, from 40 to 100. A compact fluorescent bulb (cf) that provides the same lumens (light, dummy) as a 40 watt incandescent uses 9 watts. The other 31 watts is wasted energy and is mostly converted to heat. For a 100 watt bulb, a 23 watt cf produces more light, the 77 watts again is lost as heat. So in total, I replaced 1940 watts of incandescent bulbs with 449 watts of cf, for a saving of 1491 watts with no loss in lumens. At an average daily usage of 2.4 hours for each bulb times 365 days times 1491 watts, the savings is 1306116 w/hr or 1306 kwh.

    The cost of electricity = 5.5 (electr) + 1.04 (trans) + 1.41 (distr) + 0.62 (reg) + 0.7 (debt) = 9.27 c/kwh

    For me, that means an annual savings of 1306 x 9.27 = $121.07. The bulbs cost me about $150 total and are supposedly guaranteed for 5 years. So these bulbs will pay for themselves in just over 1 year. Over 5 years, I should save [(121. x 5) -150] = $455. (that's 4 or 5 bj's )

    That's probably typical of most households, with the number of lights in use. In Toronto, say if 100,000 homes did that, it would result in total energy savings of $45,500,000., not to mention a significant reduction in greenhouse gases.

    I'm doing my bit, how about you?

  2. #2
    Interesting calculation DD...and a valid topic too! But allow me to pick on your numbers a bit, just for the sake of argument. Your figure for the cost of electricity seems higher than the retail rate in Qc...is it an Ontario or US number? In Qc the average cost of producing electricity is under 4 cents per KwH I believe. Also, where does the 2.4 hours per day come from?

  3. #3
    and never surrender
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    trawna
    Posts
    72
    there's a bunch of other charges on top of the actual cost for the electricity that are tacked on: transmission charge, distribution charge, regulatory charge, debt retirement surcharge. This is my Ontario calculation.

    I picked what I thought would be a conservative estimate for the time that a light would be on, on average per day. Obviously, all the lights won't be on for 24 hours, some may be on for 10 hours a day, some (say the basement lights) for 1 hour per day. So I guesstimated that each light would be on for an average of 2.4 hours per day.


    Oh yeah, I also flip my condoms inside out so I get to use them twice.

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