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Thread: Living with an STD... Continue Hobbying?

  1. #1

    Question Living with an STD... Continue Hobbying?

    So here it is...

    I have a friend that is in pretty much the same hobbying as all of us on this site. Although, he does not want to join this site - rather keep his sexploits private...

    Recently, he got results from a routine testing. While he was texted negative for almost everything, he did test positive for herpes HSV-1 (mouth). Now while it is an std, he is not too freaked about it. 70% of North Americans have it, with less than 10% developing symptoms. What I find surprising is that being in this hobby for so long and pretty much doing everything with the girls, that he does not have genital herpes as well...

    We had debates over how or when did he get it (probably imkpossible to pin point, given the broadness of this virus!), and should he continue this hobby as is. For the as far back as he remembers, he doesn't remember having any symptoms, cold sores or lessions. For now, he still is pondering over it.

    At the end of every discussion / debate, I just don't have any answer to give him - rather leaving it open ended. What would you guys do or say?

    Jaw

  2. #2
    >>> useless quote removed. Mod 11.

    Your comments about him being retarded and not something he can die from are not the answer he is looking for. The question is not about worrying about the disease but rather should he continue Hobbying.

    In my opinion, he can continue hobbying but he will have to be extra careful and maybe slow down on the GFE thing as well.
    Last edited by Mod 11; 07-02-2012 at 01:47 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jawbone View Post
    So here it is...

    I have a friend that is in pretty much the same hobbying as all of us on this site. Although, he does not want to join this site - rather keep his sexploits private...

    Recently, he got results from a routine testing. While he was texted negative for almost everything, he did test positive for herpes HSV-1 (mouth). Now while it is an std, he is not too freaked about it. 70% of North Americans have it, with less than 10% developing symptoms. What I find surprising is that being in this hobby for so long and pretty much doing everything with the girls, that he does not have genital herpes as well...

    Jaw
    Hello Jawbone,

    The idea that HSV-1 is an STD per se is misdirected:

    http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/h...#ixzz1zWIFHajJ

    Herpes simplex virus
    Introduction:

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common worldwide. HSV-1 is the main cause of herpes infections on the mouth and lips, including cold sores and fever blisters. It is transmitted through kissing or sharing drinking utensils. HSV-1 can also cause genital herpes, although HSV-2 is the main cause of genital herpes.

    HSV-2 is spread through sexual contact. You may be infected with HSV-1 or HSV-2 but not show any symptoms. Often symptoms are triggered by exposure to the sun, fever, menstruation, emotional stress, a weakened immune system, or an illness.

    There is no cure for herpes, and once you have it, it is likely to come back. However, some people may have one outbreak and then never have another one. In between herpes outbreaks, the virus lies dormant (as if it is hibernating or sleeping) in nerve cells.

    While exposure to HSV-1 is extremely common -- as many as 90% of American adults have been exposed to the virus -- and there is no stigma to having a cold sore, HSV-2 or genital herpes can cause embarrassment. Although there is no cure for genital herpes, an infected person can take steps to preventing spreading the disease and can continue to have a normal sex life.

    While most herpes infections do not cause serious complications, infections in infants and in people with weakened immune systems or herpes infections that affect the eyes can be life threatening.


    Causes:

    HSV-1 is spread through saliva. Kissing, using the same eating utensils, sharing personal items (such as a razor), and receiving oral sex from someone who has HSV-1 can cause you to contract the virus. HSV-2 is sexually transmitted.

    Until recently, scientists assumed that HSV-1 infections were not sexually transmitted. Now, scientists know that either type can be found in either the oral or genital area, as well as at other sites. In fact, researchers estimate that HSV-1 is responsible for up to half of all new cases of genital herpes.

    To infect people, HSV-1 and HSV-2 must get into the body through broken skin or a mucous membrane, such as inside the mouth or in the genital area. In addition to the fluid from fever blisters, each virus can be carried in bodily fluids like saliva, semen, and fluid in the female genital tract.

    Both herpes viruses may cause genital infections, and both can be contagious even if the infected person does not have active symptoms or visible blisters.

    Also, a mother can pass the infection to her baby during vaginal birth, especially if there are active blisters around the vagina at the time of delivery.


    Who gets HSV and how is it spread?

    About 70 percent of all adults in the U.S. are infected with HSV-1 and may shed virus in their saliva at any time during their lifetime, even if they don't have symptoms like sores in the mouth or cold sores.
    Anyone can get either type of HSV. HSV-1 infection usually occurs in childhood, before age 5, from close contact with someone shedding HSV-1, often with cold sores.
    Most HSV infections in newborns are caused by HSV-2 that the infant catches from the mother's birth canal.
    Newborns can sometimes get HSV-1 from close contact with someone who is shedding HSV-1 virus in their saliva or has an active HSV-1 outbreak (cold sores).


    Estimates saying that from 70-90% of people have HSV-1, and that the first infection is frequently before age 5, show that seeing escorts has little to do with the cause. I've also seen medical documentaries stating the simple act of a caring mother kissing her baby is a common cause.

    Seeing escorts only multiplies the risk...IF...you are one of the few who haven't caught it already. So if anything, the HSV-1 virus should be one of the least worries in this hobby.

    Good luck,

    Merlot

  4. #4
    Thanks for the info Merlot,

    Just to add, we were curious about HSV-1 and researched it a bit further. While it is true that many people have Herpes, there is a link found to head and neck cancer, which has shot up to 50% in the last decade.

    My friend's answer; "Heh, what can you do...?". Live your life he says. Now he's wondering if there's some type of screening for that type of cancer, just to be on the sure side...

    One thing's for sure, he's way past the fearful and doubting stage. I guess it's back to business as usual.

    Jaw

  5. #5
    More recent research show no such link, jawbone, except when the patient is also infected by HPV. http://www.herpes.org.uk/faq.html#28

  6. #6
    Thanks gugu...

    But u misunderstood... We r not talking about cervical cancer, we r talking about head and neck cancer. Besides my buddy is a dude, not a woman.

  7. #7
    Oups... bad link indeed, even if cervical may relate to neck.

    It seems that quite the same thing happens for head and neck though. HSV-1 and 2 are cofactors with alcool, tobacco and HPV. Alone, HSV seems to lower the odds of cancer.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16324878

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