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Thread: I knew it, I knew it, I knew it. Psychedelics are good for you.

  1. #1
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    I knew it, I knew it, I knew it. Psychedelics are good for you.

    Sez who? Says medical science. This 'shroom's for you, Harry Anslinger.

    Psychedelic Drugs No Risk to Mental Health, Possibly Beneficial

    Using classic psychedelic drugs does not raise the risk for mental health problems; on the contrary, it may offer some protection, new research suggests.

    Among 130,152 representative US adults, including 21,967 reported psychedelic drug users, researchers found no significant link between lifetime use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin, mescaline, or peyote and an increased rate of mental health problems.

    Rather, in several cases, psychedelic drug use was associated with a lower rate of mental health problems, Teri S. Krebs, PhD, and Pål-Ørjan Johansen, PhD, of the Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, report.

    The findings were published online August 19 in PLoS One.

    Lower Rates of Distress

    "We were not particularly surprised. Overall, there is a lack of evidence that psychedelics cause lasting mental health problems," Dr. Krebs told Medscape Medical News.

    More than 30 million Americans have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline at some time in their lives. Some case reports of mental illness in people who had used psychedelics fueled some concern of a link. But there are "many potential biases of relying on individual anecdotes," Dr. Krebs said. "In particular, mental illness is rather common, and symptoms often appear in the early 20s, which is the same time that people often first use psychedelics."

    In the current population study, after adjusting for other risk factors, there was no link between psychedelic drug use and a range of mental health outcomes, including serious psychologic distress, mental health treatment, symptoms of 8 psychiatric disorders (panic disorder, major depressive episode, mania, social phobia, general anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and nonaffective psychosis), and 7 specific symptoms of nonaffective psychosis.

    In fact, lifetime use of psilocybin or mescaline and past-year use of LSD were associated with lower rates of serious psychologic distress. Lifetime use of LSD was also significantly associated with a lower rate of outpatient mental health treatment and psychiatric medicine prescription.

    "We cannot exclude the possibility that use of psychedelics might have a negative effect on mental health for some individuals or groups, perhaps counterbalanced at a population level by a positive effect on mental health in others," the authors note. Nevertheless, "recent clinical trials have also failed to find any evidence of any lasting harmful effects of psychedelics."

    Less Harmful

    "This is an important analysis," Matthew W. Johnson, PhD, of the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore, Maryland, who was not involved in the study, told Medscape Medical News.

    "Although there is evidence suggesting beneficial effects of psychedelics in well-controlled clinical research, that does not address the occurrence of psychiatric adverse effects in the population. It is very interesting to know that these drugs are not associated with adverse mental health outcomes at the population level," Dr. Johnson said.

    "However, as the authors note, it is certainly possible that individual recreational users experience harms. This analysis would just suggest that this may be limited in scope, and possibly offset by some individuals also receiving benefit at the population level," he added.

    This study "chimes very much with what we know already about psychedelics — that they are essentially much less harmful than other illicit substances," Mark Bolstridge, BSc, MRCPsych, Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Imperial College London, United Kingdom, told Medscape Medical News.

    "Having personally worked in mental health and trained in psychiatry, I am yet to see any individual suffering from significant mental health problems as a result of using psychedelics. Alcohol, amphetamines, and cannabis, yes, but never psychedelics," said Dr. Bolstridge, who was not involved in the study.

    Dr. Krebs noted that "psychedelics interact with a specific type of serotonin receptor in the brain and may stimulate the formation of new connections and patterns. They generally seem to open an individual to an awareness of new perspectives and opportunities for action. People often report deeply personally and spiritually meaningful experiences with psychedelics," she said.

    Researchers at Imperial College London have found that healthy adults recall memories much more vividly while under the influence of psilocybin, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data reveal a neurobiological basis for this effect, as reported by Medscape Medical News.

    Their research also shows that psilocybin has potential in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and possibly cluster headaches.

    Debunking Myths

    "We know categorically that psychedelics taken in a controlled clinical environment with appropriate support almost certainly never lead to any recurring or enduring mental health problems," Dr. Bolstridge said.

    "All in all, I think the [new] paper is an important addition to the scientific literature, and it can only help in dispelling the myths surrounding these much maligned substances and in reinforcing the case for continued investigations into how these fascinating compounds work in the brain," Dr. Bolstridge said.

    "In particular, [it can help in] attempting to determine whether they can prove effective in helping those patients incapacitated by ongoing mental health problems and who are little helped by conventional psychiatric treatments," he added.

    Dr. Krebs said clinical trials looking at the potential benefits of psilocybin in alcoholism and smoking cessation are also under way. Last year, she and Dr. Johansen published a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of LSD in alcoholism, which provided evidence for a beneficial effect of LSD for treating alcohol dependency.

    The study was supported by the Research Council of Norway. The authors, Dr. Johnson, and Dr. Bolstridge report no relevant financial relationships.


    Full article here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info:...l.pone.0063972
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  2. #2
    I know people that have taken LSD trips and never came back.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muammar Gaddafi View Post
    I know people that have taken LSD trips and never came back.
    Syd Barrett, innovative guitarist for early Pink Floyd and their founding member, took a trip and never came back. The classic Pink Floyd song, "Shine on You Crazy Diamond", was written for this genius who gave his mind to LSD.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLKiMbC6s2k
    Last edited by EagerBeaver; 08-31-2013 at 09:05 PM.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Muammar Gaddafi View Post
    I know people that have taken LSD trips and never came back.
    Generally it is because those people were from the start genetically predisposed to develop psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. Most people will recover from a toxic psychosis (the proverbial "bad trip") once the substance responsible for it has been totally metabolized and eliminated from the body. Those who don't return to their normal self are those who, one way or the other, would have developed a classic psychosis anyways. Of course, using psychedelics regularly over a prolonged period of time will have a durable impact on your cognitions, affects and perceptions, but not to the point of generating a psychosis, unless as I said you are predisposed. That being said, it is relatively well documented that LSD and psilocybin can positively improve certain clinical conditions, under strict therapeutic regimen. I am myself a mental health professional and I have also experienced widely with those substances in the past. So I can tell from both personal and professional experience how they can affect mental conditions.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by EagerBeaver View Post
    Syd Barrett, innovative guitarist for early Pink Floyd and their founding member, took a trip and never came back. The classic Pink Floyd song, "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" was written for this genius who gave his mind to LSD.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLKiMbC6s2k
    He took more than just a trip... And suffered probably from Asperger's syndrome or schizophrenia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EagerBeaver View Post
    Syd Barrett, innovative guitarist for early Pink Floyd and their founding member, took a trip and never came back.
    Speculation. Nothing but speculation. Barrett had significant other problems.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by rumpleforeskiin View Post
    Speculation. Nothing but speculation. Barrett had significant other problems.
    You are totally right on this one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Madmanacross View Post
    This being said, it is relatively well documented that LSD and psilocybin can positively improve certain clinical conditions, under strict therapeutic regimen.
    When much younger, I gobbled psychedelics like they were candy. In all honesty, I credit my still youthful outlook on life to the (thoroughly non-clinical) use of all the psychedelics listed above, including peyote despite it's awful taste. It's been over 30 years, but I'm now giving serious thought to taking another stroll through the doors of perception.
    The mounties always get their man.

  9. #9
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syd_Barrett

    "Through late 1967 and early 1968, Barrett's behaviour became increasingly erratic and unpredictable, partly as a consequence of his reported heavy use of psychedelic drugs, most prominently LSD. Many report having seen him on stage with the group, strumming on one chord through the entire concert, or not playing at all. At a show at The Fillmore in San Francisco, during a performance of "Interstellar Overdrive", Barrett slowly detuned his guitar. The audience seemed to enjoy such antics, unaware of the rest of the band's consternation. Interviewed on Pat Boone's show during this tour, Syd's reply to Boone's questions was a "blank and totally mute stare,"[70] according to Nick Mason, "Syd wasn't into moving his lips that day." Barrett exhibited related behaviour during the band's first appearance on Dick Clark's popular TV show American Bandstand.[70] Although surviving footage of this appearance shows Barrett miming his parts of the song competently,[71] during a group interview afterwards, when asked two questions by Clark, Barrett's answers were terse, almost to the point of rudeness (though, as Clark admitted, they had been flying non-stop from London to Los Angeles). Before a performance in late 1967, Barrett reportedly crushed Mandrax tranquilliser tablets and an entire tube of Brylcreem into his hair, which subsequently melted down his face under the heat of the stage lighting,[72] making him look like "a guttered candle".Nick Mason later disputed the Mandrax portion of this story, stating that "Syd would never waste good mandies".[74]
    During their UK tour with Jimi Hendrix in November 1967, guitarist David O'List from The Nice was called in to substitute for Barrett on several occasions when he was unable to perform or failed to appear.[75] And sometime around Christmas, David Gilmour (Barrett's old school friend) was asked to join the band as a second guitarist to cover for Barrett, whose erratic behaviour prevented him from performing. For a handful of shows Gilmour played and sang while Barrett wandered around on stage, occasionally deciding to join in playing. The other band members soon grew tired of Barrett's antics and, on 26 January 1968, when Waters was driving on the way to a show at Southampton University, the band elected not to pick Barrett up: one person in the car said, "Shall we pick Syd up?" and another said, "Let's not bother."[76][77][78][79] As Barrett had, up until then, written the overwhelming bulk of the band's material the initial plan was to keep him in the group as a non-touring member—as The Beach Boys had done with Brian Wilson—but this soon proved to be impractical.[78][80][81]
    According to Roger Waters, Barrett came into what was to be their last practice session with a new song he had dubbed "Have You Got It Yet?". The song seemed simple enough when he first presented it to his bandmates, but it soon became impossibly difficult to learn and they eventually realised that while they were practising it, Barrett kept changing the arrangement.[78][81] He would then play it again, with the arbitrary changes, and sing "Have you got it yet?". Eventually they realised they never would and that they were simply bearing the brunt of Barrett's idiosyncratic sense of humour.[82] Waters had called it "a real act of mad genius".[78][81]
    Barrett did not contribute material to the band after A Sau****ul of Secrets was released in 1968. Of the songs he wrote for Pink Floyd after The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, only one ("Jugband Blues") made it to the band's second album; one ("Apples and Oranges") became a less-than-successful single, and two others ("Scream Thy Last Scream" and "Vegetable Man") were never officially released. Barrett supposedly spent time outside the recording studio, in the reception area, waiting to be invited in. He also showed up to a few gigs and glared at Gilmour. Barrett played slide guitar on "Remember a Day" (which had been first attempted during the Piper sessions), and also played on "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun". On 6 April 1968, the group officially announced Barrett was no longer a member of Pink Floyd, the same day the band's contract with Blackhill Enterprises was terminated."

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    Which mental health professional wrote that after examining him at length, Beav. And how come you omitted the rest of the article, where it was suggested that there were numerous other possible causes for his erratic behaviour? Huh? Huh?

    Here you go, in case you missed it: "There has been much speculation concerning Barrett's psychological well-being. Many believe he suffered from schizophrenia.[82][180][181] A diagnosis of bipolar disorder has also been considered.[182] Some have also suggested that Barrett might have had Asperger's Syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder.[183]"
    The mounties always get their man.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John S. Black View Post
    others I personally know who took drugs are fucked up at different levelsmnot to say they would not be like this if they never did stuff who knows.
    Well, the doctors who did this study of a very sizeable group of people seem to know.
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  12. #12
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLKiMbC6s2k

    Lyrics to "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" by Pink Floyd

    "Remember when you were young, you shone like the sun.
    Shine on you crazy diamond.
    Now there's a look in your eyes, like black holes in the sky.
    Shine on you crazy diamond.
    You were caught on the crossfire of childhood and stardom,
    blown on the steel breeze.
    Come on you target for faraway laughter,
    come on you stranger, you legend, you martyr, and shine!
    You reached for the secret too soon, you cried for the moon.
    Shine on you crazy diamond.
    Threatened by shadows at night, and exposed in the light.
    Shine on you crazy diamond.
    Well you wore out your welcome with random precision,
    rode on the steel breeze.
    Come on you raver, you seer of visions,
    come on you painter, you piper, you prisoner, and shine!"

    Lyrics speak for themselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EagerBeaver View Post
    Lyrics speak for themselves.
    You're too fucking much, Beav. So, if they speak for themselves, what do they say? Full explication, please.
    The mounties always get their man.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by rumpleforeskiin View Post
    Which mental health professional wrote that after examining him at length, Beav. And how come you omitted the rest of the article, where it was suggested that there were numerous other possible causes for his erratic behaviour? Huh? Huh?

    Here you go, in case you missed it: "There has been much speculation concerning Barrett's psychological well-being. Many believe he suffered from schizophrenia.[82][180][181] A diagnosis of bipolar disorder has also been considered.[182] Some have also suggested that Barrett might have had Asperger's Syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder.[183]"
    The Asperger syndrome hypothesis is the most interesting one, from my point of view. Barrett became erratic, not delusional and he did not have auditory hallucinations. So it couldn't be paranoid schizophrenia, may be hebephrenic schizophrenia, but even that I doubt. Apparently, Barrett was quite incapable of understanding social conventions and communication and he had stereotyped behaviors; those were his main handicaps, and this is in line with an ASD (autism spectrum disorder)

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    Quote Originally Posted by rumpleforeskiin View Post
    You're too fucking much, Beav. So, if they speak for themselves, what do they say? Full explication, please.
    You don't understand the song? Your kidding me, right? Did you even know the song was about Syd Barrett until I posted it in this thread? Why don't you call Dave Gilmour and Roger Waters and ask this question, and when they hang up on you, I would suggest you play the song about 10 times and maybe you will figure it out.

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