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Anyone lost their job recently?

lastvisit

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Dec 16, 2008
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I got kicked to the curb at the end of October 2017 after a long stretch of full time contract work. The company I had worked for sold out and the new company deemed me expendable. It was a shock and made me evaluate a lot in the weeks that followed on spending habits and saving habits. It is amazing how you adjust to having no money coming in. I am fortunate in that I had a good network of contacts that enabled me to snag some work that will begin in February but will require me to be away from home and back in the field (for this think oilfield work). I was wondering if anyone else had similar experiences and how you felt and adjusted. I had previously wanted to visit Montreal in April but now that may change to August at best if possible. Thanks for the time on this gents.
 

neverbored

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Emotionally, loosing your job and breaking up can be very similar. Emotions (good and bad) hit you in waves. But the moment you find a new job or new girl, might come to realize that you weren't really happy in the situation or even better, actually regret not leaving it sooner.

I remember back in late 2000 I was fired from my 1st executive job. I had worked so hard to get there and just couldn't accept being let go. Stragely as I look back Today, I can't beleive I actually last there that long...

A few weeks after being let go, I heard about a book called "Who moved my cheese?" by Spencer Johnson. This book changed my perspective on many aspects in my life (not just professional). I still give copies to friends when I sense they might be struggling. Its probably the easiest read (2 hours) and it really helped me.

I don't know how old you are, but I can tell you that it always gets better you might not see it yet... life just has an aswesome way of balancing out.

As for myself, I learnt that I'm a horrible executive lol Losing that job allowed me to realize that I actually loved working in the field. I was miserable being stuck in pointeless meetings all the time. Since, I've started a few businesses, hired people to do the meetings and allowed me to focus on the things I love and am good at.... I'm now thinking I should send that guy a bottle of scotch for firing me. Best thing that ever happened to my carreer.

Good luck man.


PS. If you're going to Alberta, there are some DAMN FINE girls to check out ;)
 

Gordon Ramsay

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The world is changing. I know a family run business that use to be a 40 person operation. Now it is a 6 person operation with a huge building that they bought during good times. The business wil finally closes down the kids will not inherit the business. The building will be sold and it will be the end of sn era for that family.
 

neverbored

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I know a family run business ... The business wil finally closes down the kids will not inherit the business
Out of curiosity, what industry are they in ?

I'm amazed to see so many successful businesses where the kids want nothing to do with it. It must be heart-breaking for the fathers.
 

sambuca

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I personally found "Who Moved My Cheese?" a bit overrated. As someone who moves around every four-five years or so, sometimes a merger sometimes on my own accord, it seemed more appropriate for the long-term employee who drew so much of their identity and self-esteem from their job and one company.

Strangely, you still come across people who have spent most of their adult life with one organization. These types still tend to look down on the people who have done different things at different places. I just think to myself "boy, you've been lucky playing the game at one organization".
 

Sol Tee Nutz

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Apr 29, 2012
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Look behind you.
When you start work again keep with the low spending for 4 months and see the money you save. As for sticking with the same company, a friend of mine got his 35 yr pin with Telus, he now gets a pension of $4,100 a month till both him and his wife dies.
 

lastvisit

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Thanks for the comments gents : I appreciate the input. Neverbored , I understand that good and bad come from new situations and by the way I live in Alberta. I travel to Montreal to look out for an aging family member : I worry now my new situation may not permit me the freedom to do so and enjoy that wonderful city. I do not hobby in Alberta and was curious about your comments on "damn fine girls" to check out. STN , I won't have to worry about low spending as I will be in a camp situation south of GP : kind of like an all inclusive but you have to work. Thanks again gents for the time and your comments.
 

Sol Tee Nutz

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Apr 29, 2012
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Look behind you.
I work in camps a lot also, you are not there for 4 months straight, during your rotation as the saying goes, hookers and blow and shopping time.
Anyways best of luck with the new job.
 

EagerBeaver

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As far as work interfering with one’s ability to care for aging family members I have the same issue right now. It’s all on me due to a completely unreliable sibling who cannot be counted on for a damn thing. I do worry that I will at some point be forced to give up my job and move to another State in order to be close to and attend to the needs of the aging family members. I do not relish that possibility. However I am mentally prepared to do what I must and relocate if need be. My attitude is much like that of neverbored, sometimes when one’s circumstances are compelled to change there could be a silver lining in it.

Good luck in Alberta, at least your cost of living is something that needn’t worry you with the all inclusive set up. Do they provide facilities where one can access escorts or at least host them? Or must one go “off campus”?
 

Sol Tee Nutz

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Apr 29, 2012
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Look behind you.
EB. Majority of camps have tight security, they are meant for work and rest. His only option would be to try and pick up a camp attendant ( could be up to 2000 guys and 10 girls ) or drive to GP where the quality is sub par and prices high.
 

lastvisit

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Thanks for the comments EB. My situation with elderly family members is essentially one of power of attorney at present. Prior to that a lot of my visits to Montreal were caretaking roles which was difficult to say the least. As STN mentions camp life is work and rest (in my case it will be a 2 drilling rig pad so smaller in terms of personnel): I wouldn't dream of jumping a camp attendant or going to GP for that : it isn't Montreal style in terms of choice or cost either.
 

hungry101

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Strangely, you still come across people who have spent most of their adult life with one organization. These types still tend to look down on the people who have done different things at different places. I just think to myself "boy, you've been lucky playing the game at one organization".
It goes both way Sam. I see a lot of movers and shakers that never let the grass grow under their feet. I am talking about mid-level mangers/director level people that look at a professional that spends 20-30 years in the same job as a loser. I look at that same person as an expert.
 

Numerati

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After going through two layoffs some +10 years ago it was a major wake up call. From there it is very important to develop a few side hussles. If the side hussles take off where you make the same amount or more likely surpass what you make at some job you don't have to be worried anymore. It is not easy btw. For a year or two it is going to be tough. If you don't know where and how to start begin freelancing and work your way up until you figure things out where you do not need a job to generate income.

Good luck.
 

lastvisit

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Thanks to Hungry, Sam and Numerati for your helpful points. Given my background I am a bit of a specialist/expert due to experience and it certainly hasn't hurt. In fact its how I was able to move on and do something else. It also didn't hurt to have contacts. It will entail a different lifestyle but eventually it will be benificial.
 

hungry101

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Now a days, most people go through this 2-3 times in a career. I think it gets a little tougher when you are older and you are unwilling to relocate. But your situation is not unique. The old guys told me that it used to be that if you made 10 years at a company that you were theirs and you basically had a career there. That has been over for 20 years now. Things have changed. Pensions are a thing of the past and you have to save for yourself. Corporations cry because it cost them so much to train young employee just to see them jump jobs for a better opportunity. The problem is, that they created this atmosphere when they did away with pensions. A pension was a nice consolation prize for career professionals that weren't anointed for greatness.
The point is that people change jobs a lot more frequently than they used to for a number of reasons. You ought to land back on your feet. Good luck.
 

lastvisit

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True on the being older front: it was difficult at first accepting they wanted to get rid of me, but I was contract and had no pension entitlements. I have looked after that financial part of the equation for years now on my own and will continue to do so as i move forward. It seems these days you need to look out for yourself financially long term and I have been fortunate since the 2008 and 2009 meltdowns. Again thanks for the kind words gents.
 

sambuca

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Sep 9, 2015
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Now a days, most people go through this 2-3 times in a career. I think it gets a little tougher when you are older and you are unwilling to relocate. But your situation is not unique. The old guys told me that it used to be that if you made 10 years at a company that you were theirs and you basically had a career there. That has been over for 20 years now. Things have changed. Pensions are a thing of the past and you have to save for yourself. Corporations cry because it cost them so much to train young employee just to see them jump jobs for a better opportunity. The problem is, that they created this atmosphere when they did away with pensions. A pension was a nice consolation prize for career professionals that weren't anointed for greatness.
The point is that people change jobs a lot more frequently than they used to for a number of reasons. You ought to land back on your feet. Good luck.
You make a good point. Every manager and executive I know complains how hard it is to retain or recruit young employees with some skills and experience. That's the world we've created. Many times they think they are going to get a bargain basement deal. Good luck!

Hire someone outside the box......an older employee or a mother returning to the workforce. Some times are friends and colleagues don't even know they are discriminating unless someone they know points it out.
 

Mr. Banana

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Nov 16, 2011
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Business downsizing has been going on for years, through outsourcing, contracting. mechanizing and using more efficient methods. Less people needed to do more work.
 

jalimon

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Dec 28, 2015
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Business downsizing has been going on for years, through outsourcing, contracting. mechanizing and using more efficient methods. Less people needed to do more work.
Wait t'ill we get to automated car/truck driving!

Cheers,
 
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Who knows
Wait t'ill we get to automated car/truck driving!

Cheers,
Still in Canada and the us , we have nearly full employment! I think mechanization , AI, and other technologies will not imped jobs, they will just reduce the number of good paying jobs for the uneducated. People will work but be poorer.