Mirage Escort
Montreal Escorts

Need single malt whiskey to go with my cigars.

J. Peterman

New Member
Feb 26, 2004
776
0
0
Visit site
As mentioned in my other thread, I will be picking up some cigars in Cuba on my next trip. Can anyone tell me of a good single malt scotch to go with the cigars?
 

loves-women

Member
May 26, 2004
189
1
18
Visit site
I recently started drinking Glenmorangie Portwood Finish ($60 at the SAQ). I enjoy it. I previously drank Cardhu single malt but it's on back-order right now. Also, there is some nasty talk about Cardhu being "blended".
Peeping Tom... Good list. I plan on sampling (who am I fooling- I mean buying) some of the brands you suggested.
 

bennyboy

in search of ...
May 10, 2003
163
0
0
Visit site
if i may...

i would highly recommend an islay malt to compliment a good cigar. my all-time favourite has to be lagavulin (pronounced laga-voolin)

excellent mossy, smoky notes that will compliment the cigar

slightly more expensive than glemorangie, but well worth the money

another option is johhn walker blue - but again - high on the price scale...

try the lagavulin and you will be hooked - and you'll thank me later...
 

J. Peterman

New Member
Feb 26, 2004
776
0
0
Visit site
Just to get off the subject slightly..............................

I can recommend Gaston LeGrange Napolian Cognac, It is of a very good quality at a very reasonable price for such a fine drink.

p.s. .......lOVES WOMAN,


what difference is it if it is blended? It how much you enjoy the product that matters. I doubt that any quality manufacturer would risk their reputation by offering a questionable product.
 
Last edited:

bennyboy

in search of ...
May 10, 2003
163
0
0
Visit site
ahh...but if we are to begin adding cognacs, we might well evolve into another thread altogether...

i am a great fan of louis XIV, or Remy XO (-:

as for pricing, mr. peterman, the lagavulin (my #1 choice, and yours as soon as you try it...) is $76 (as per SAQ website)
keep it at room temperature, keep the glass at the same, and be sure to take the time to enjoy the bouquet...

in fact, think i'll fix me a glass now...
 

J. Peterman

New Member
Feb 26, 2004
776
0
0
Visit site
I like to splash mine.

Wheather it be a fine cognac, single malt scotch or a blended scotch like Johnny Walker Blue, I like to splash my drink with chilled sping water or 7 up. (chilled almost to the freezing point)
 

Captain Bly

New Member
Nov 21, 2003
26
0
0
Visit site
Master_Oldies said:
I AGREE!!!

Lagavulin 16 year old is one of the best . A delightful experience.

Master Oldies
Absolutely, the best there is. Not cheap though, I normally buy it an Heathrow or Amsterdam Duty Free.
 

Peeping Tom

New Member
Mar 12, 2003
164
0
0
Visit site
For those inclined to get to the nitty gritty details the Laing series of rare malts is most interesting, especially in the manner the casks play against each other from batch to batch. Not for the inexperienced.
 

tmgol

A Gentleman and a Scholar
Feb 19, 2005
32
0
0
Southeastern US
Last time I was up in Montreal I was overjoyed to find that SAQ had started carrying Bruichladdich, specifically the Fifteen. "The Laddie" comes from one of the few truly independent distilleries out there; it was brought out of mothballs quite recently by people who just plain care about making traditional and top-quality Islay malts. Bruichladdich is also well-known to hard-core fans of the great Rt. Hon Francis Urquhart as the deliciously evil P.M.'s favorite drink.

Okay, so there's plenty of reasons to love the idea of the Laddie...but how does it taste? Well, I am usually a Speyside man; but when I feel like an Islay malt, the Laddie is the perfect choice for me. It has that nice bracing character, without being overwhelming with the peat or iodide (I'm speaking of the most common issuings...there are a few less-common bottlings that are a good deal heavier on the peat). It's enough of an Islay to not be for the uninitiated, or for those who actually prefer the taste of a good smooth blend but are too afraid to admit it (which they shouldn't be); but it's not in the same cojones-testing category of, say, Laphroaig. There is complexity, but I find it more refreshing than rich in the end; and I did not find any overdone "finishing" getting in the way. Get yourself a dram, cut with a bit of spring water (cool is okay, but not too cold!), and enjoy.
 

Peeping Tom

New Member
Mar 12, 2003
164
0
0
Visit site
I tried the Bruichladdie 15 year and wasn't too impressed - probably my last choice among the Islays. I'm leaning more towards the Lagavulin and Ardbeg malts.
 

tmgol

A Gentleman and a Scholar
Feb 19, 2005
32
0
0
Southeastern US
Peeping Tom said:
I tried the Bruichladdie 15 year and wasn't too impressed - probably my last choice among the Islays. I'm leaning more towards the Lagavulin and Ardbeg malts.
For my part, I didn't find the Ardbeg to my taste...but de gustibus non disputandum est, non?

For some reason I've never got round to trying the Lagavulin, but I certainly will now, with such high recommendations turning up here. Would anyone care to share a little more about why you love it so much?
 

bennyboy

in search of ...
May 10, 2003
163
0
0
Visit site
so glad this thread has been reborn...

a new addition to the libations (for me anyway) is la familia tequila.
vintage, pricey, and the closest thing i've ever had to a fine cognac without drinking cognac.

truly a treasure of a discovery

was $30 usd a shot in acapulco, but man....nectar of the gods.

i picked up a bottle at dutyfree for 87 usd.

(-:
 

Peeping Tom

New Member
Mar 12, 2003
164
0
0
Visit site
The Lagavulin is a heavily peated and very smokey malt. If you like Islay malts in general, think of the Lagavulin as the strongman of that family.
 

J. Peterman

New Member
Feb 26, 2004
776
0
0
Visit site
Irish Whiskey.

I was told that Irish whiskey was quite a bit smoother, since it is distilled twice. Can anyone verify this to be true, or it it just the quality of the booze you buy?
 

tmgol

A Gentleman and a Scholar
Feb 19, 2005
32
0
0
Southeastern US
J. Peterman said:
I was told that Irish whiskey was quite a bit smoother, since it is distilled twice. Can anyone verify this to be true, or it it just the quality of the booze you buy?
Bushmills in particular makes a big deal out of being triple-distilled according to common, if not universal, Irish practice. (By contrast, double-distilling is traditional for Scotch). But, like their claim to being the world's oldest licensed whiskey distillery, the value of this is worthy of some skepticism.

I don't doubt that a little additional purity, and perhaps smoothness, can be attained by the additional distillation; but the law of diminishing returns surely kicks in big-time at some point, and it is also possible that something important could start to be lost if you distilled any beverage too many times.

It is also true that precisely what you're distilling is more important than how many times you distill it. Many Scotch afficionados judge Irish whiskeys to come up short in this essential criterion, and thus turn up their noses at it. Personally, I think they're being a bit hasty if they make blanket condemnations. Yes, it's faintly ridiculous for the likes of Bushmills to have tried to capitalize on the single-malt craze that started in the 90s by issuing "single-malt" bottlings of their whiskey; but I still find that a dram of Bushmills or Black Bush makes a fine accompaniment to a pint of Guinness when one is enjoying a relaxed evening in an Irish pub.
 

J. Peterman

New Member
Feb 26, 2004
776
0
0
Visit site
I too, find that a good cigar and a good drink should be enjoyed by alone by themselves so that they can be truely appreciated. These two, on their own can be complimented by a good meal and fine company.
 
Toronto Escorts