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Thread: Any mountaineers/climbers out there

  1. #1

    Any mountaineers/climbers out there

    Hey all, as my name suggests I am in to climbing. With that said Iíd like to know if anyone else out there is also? I am also looking for beta on Mt. Hood because I am going there to attempt a winter summit in March.

    If you are a climber, mountaineer or a backpacker please reply or I guess this thread will come to a sad ending.

    NYC

  2. #2
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    Yes sir

    Hi there

    I work a lot with the French and Swiss alps as a tour operator in the ski and hiking industry.

    We offer ski packages allover the Alps but I was planning in setting up a Tour du Mt Blanc 9 days walking and sleeping 8 nights in nice "refuge"

    I have the knowledge and capacity to guide this tour.

    I am not planning it on a professional side but only because I want to do it and it's hard to find people for this kind of tour.

  3. #3

    More

    Well, I’m glad to see at least a few more out there. I try to do at least one major trip a year. In the last few years I have managed to climb the Grand Teton, Mt. Whitney and through hike the JMT. As I stated in my first post I am going to try Mt Hood and we decided to try Mt Rainier on the same trip since they are so close. I welcome any adventure stories anyone wants to share.

    NYC
    Last edited by NYClimber; 11-12-2006 at 01:36 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYClimber
    I am also looking for beta on Mt. Hood because I am going there to attempt a winter summit in March.
    NYC
    Why settle for a half assed mountain like that? I say you should climb Mount Everest. Why? Because, as Sir Edmund Hilary once said, it's there. And the climb could also kill you if you don't do it right. Nobody gets killed climbing pussy mountains like Mount Hood.

    You should read the book, "Into Thin Air".
    Last edited by EagerBeaver; 11-12-2006 at 05:41 PM.

  5. #5
    Franky sayz
    EB obviously knows NOTHING about climbing. Everest? overrated for the bang/buck ratio.
    Franky is an avid climber. I have climbed Mt. Hood in winter, Mt. Rainer twice in summer, so NYClimber feel free to ask away. The coolest option is to bring alpine touring skii's and skin up to the "gates" and then ski back down. If I ever do the route again, that is how I will do it. Rainer in March, well lots of misery for that summitt. You better be very good at route finding and crevass work.
    By the way, if you are not too bent on mt Hood, March is a PHENOMINAL time to go and climb in the alps. I have summited there as well. I am probably heading there myself, fancy a side trip to an FKK club?
    So NYCLIMBER, do you ice climb? If you find an sp who climbs let me know, I would die for that. I previously asked about it but got mostly tongue in check responses.
    good luck with the trip
    franky

  6. #6

    Re:

    Franky, Iíve traded in my skis for a snowboard but the thought of boarding down certainly crossed my mind. I will definitely PM you later for info. Iím always looking for new people to put up routes with so maybe we will hook up sometime. A few of sp Iíve discussed climbing with have only done gym climbing.

    Roland, if you ever get a chance climb Whitney itís awesome. Even if you donít want to do a technical route try the Mountaineer Route; although not really technical Iíd bring a small selection of gear as there are a couple exposed moves.

    Iíll post a story soon of the first time I tried to summit the Grand Teton in the middle of summer and got snowed off.

    NYC

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by EagerBeaver
    Why settle for a half assed mountain like that? I say you should climb Mount Everest. Why? Because, as Sir Edmund Hilary once said, it's there. And the climb could also kill you if you don't do it right. Nobody gets killed climbing pussy mountains like Mount Hood.

    You should read the book, "Into Thin Air".
    Is this a joke?

    Over 130 people have been killed on Mt Hood, including 11 climbers on one day in May of 1986.

    Into Thin Air was a good book written by a guy who'd never climbed anything much more challenging than Mt Hood himself prior to Everest. He and many others attempting to climb it, "because it's there," have no business being there, and that's part of why there are so many deaths (just under 200)-everyone wants to climb the tallest mountain. Mt Everest has turned into the farce of the 8000 meter peaks with guided ascents, permanent camps and fixed ropes and little creativity as to climbing routes. People take the easiest route, the South col route, because most of them aren't experienced enough to try anything else. In past generations, Doug Scott, Reinhold Messner, Chris Bonnington, Mallory and Irvin made routes like the North Ridge and the Southwest Face famous.

    Today you have socialites who just want to be able to say they've climbed Everest because it will impress people who don't know anything about climbing. These people have no more climbing experience or ability than...you or I. They've made a farce of a deadly sport instead of building up to 8000 meter peaks the way great mountaineers like Scott, Kurtyka, Messner, Kukuczka, Boukreev and others did.

    Michael Richards-you know, Kramer from Seinfeld-has climbed Mt Everest. He, like many other inexperienced western climbers, bought his way up, using oxygen, fixed ropes and hiring others to carry much of his load. Is it an accomplishment? Yes. Does it make him a great climber? Not even close.

    Height is the sole determinant of a mountain's greatness for those who don't know mountaineering. In fact, I think if you asked Messner, he'd probably tell you Nanga Parbat and K2 are far harder than Everest.


    If you want a popular book, Into Thin Air is good. If you want a serious climbing book, there are many better:

    K2 Triumph and Tragedy, Jim Curran
    The Endless Knot, Kurt Diemberger
    Himalayan Climber, Doug Scott
    My Vertical World, Jurek Kukuczka
    All Fourteen 8000ers, Reinhold Messner
    Last edited by btyger; 11-15-2006 at 01:04 AM.
    Why are homely people discriminated against...we're the majority

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roland
    Huntington Ravine,Mount Washinton. Caught 85 mph gusts last time. The boulders kept us from flying.
    One of my favorite hikes...great scenery and unlike most of Mt Washington it's never crowded

    I don't do technical climbing, but if you want challenging and interesting hikes in New England and you like Huntington Ravine, here's some others worth the trip

    King Ravine on Mt Adams, especially the Great Gully Trail

    The North Slide of Tripyramid

    The Great Gulf

    The Bonds, which are best done as a backpacking trip

    Castle Ravine on Mt Jefferson

    The Knife Edge, Katahdin

    Six Husbands Trail, Mt Jefferson

    Mahoosuc Notch......

    Any peakbaggers here? I finished the 4000 footers a number of years ago, but it turn out there are about 1000 lists for peakbaggers to finish in the northeast, and I've met some people who are pretty fanatical. My father has a friend who climbed all the hundred highest in New England in one winter-he works seasonally
    Last edited by btyger; 11-15-2006 at 12:57 AM.
    Why are homely people discriminated against...we're the majority

  9. #9
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    Epic Big Mountain Big Wall Climbs

    Quote Originally Posted by franky
    . Everest? overrated for the bang/buck ratio.
    This got me thinking of some epic ascents in Himalayan/Karakoram history.

    I'm not a mountaineer, just an occasional peakbagger, but mostly I hike for sport.

    I love reading about some of the epic big wall ascents, though...thought up a list of some of my favorite epics:

    South-south west Ridge of K2-The Magic Line

    South Face of Lhotse

    Southwest Face of Everest

    West Face of Gasherbrum IV

    South Face of Annapurna

    Southwest Face of Kanchenjunga

    The Rupal Flank of Nanga Parbat

    The Kukuzcka/Piotrowski Route, South Face, K2


    The scale of these climbs is absurdly spectacular, and to top it off, they're at altitude
    Why are homely people discriminated against...we're the majority

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roland
    Seems like NYClimber...a gentleman...who didn't spike EB ..yet...will be far from being lonely here...and it is so hard to find climbers at the same level.
    I didn't mean to pick on that post, but there's a real obsession and a belief that climbing the tallest mountain in a region will suddenly propel a novice to the status of a great climber/hiker. It won't, but this misguided notion makes people who couldn't climb Mount Adams want to climb Mount Everest. There's no patience. What happened to walk before you run?

    It's no Everest, not even Mt Hood, but in my area, Mt Washington is singled out, and it's sad what it's been turned into. There are many great features to Mt Washington, but I hate the summit. It's tough to spend a few hours climbing up Boot Spurr, or the Great Gulf, etc, sweating and enjoying great scenery, only to find yourself immersed, not just with other hikers, but also those who've ridden a train or driven a car to the top.

    It's sacrilege to criticize the tourism industry in NH, but look at it this way: I once climbed up, only to overhear a woman complaining, "I didn't know there'd be so many stairs," after she drove up. That was tough to take.

    Very often, the most beautiful, most challenging and most rewarding mountain in a region is not the tallest.

    While I can only read and dream about mountains like K2 and Everest (I don't have $65000 and a four month sabbatical to spend anyway) some of the stories of epics on K2, Kanch, Nanga Parbat and other mountains are more fascinating.
    If you really like that kind of writing, and if you liked Into Thin Air, Doug Scott, Kurt Diemberger, and Jim Curran, who's not really a mountaineer himself, have some great reads.
    The story of the summer of 1986 on K2, in which two major new ascents were made, and 13 people died is harrowing, and Doug Scott's tale of survival on the Ogre is awesome.
    Last edited by btyger; 11-15-2006 at 09:23 AM.
    Why are homely people discriminated against...we're the majority

  11. #11
    franky sayz
    Nice posts now on this. My favorite climbing book is "white spider". the eiger is such a classic climb nowadays and the story of the first attempts are great. I think it is the mountain with the most "history". It is also probably one of the greatest climbs for an aspiring climber but is now probably better in winter because of the loss of the snow fields in summer. I wont babble too much about this.
    For those interested, Chamonix is the place to head for a week or two of climbing. The cable cars make the high mountains really easy to access. Climbs are as easy or as tough as you want. Trips back to the valley are short and espresso and cigarettes can be easily had. I have never gotten laid there but if I had I would now be living there.
    franky

  12. #12

    A Climbing Story

    Mid summer several years ago my climbing buddy and I went to Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming for 8 days to try and climb the Grand Teton (13,370 ft) of which about 1400 ft of it is actual rock climbing. Itís about a 6.5-mile hike up with about 6000 ft of elevation gain before the climbing starts. It rained for the first 2 days so we just hung out at a campground and got our gear together. My regular backpack weight is around 28-32 lbs and I had to add about 25 lbs of climbing gear (rope, carabiners, protection, etc.) so I was humping 55+ lbs up the mountain. We finally got some good weather and the report for the next 5 days was good so we started. The first day we hiked 4 miles in (and up) to a place called Petzoldt Caves. This might have been the most exhausting hike I have done at the time. We had to cross small rivers, boulder fields and lots of elevation to get there. The next morning while we were packing for the rest of the hike up we ran into a ranger who said a massive storm was moving in but there was a small chance it might miss us, so we continued up. It took us 5 hours to hike 2.5 miles up to the base of a small cliff that must be climbed to get to an area known as the Lower Saddle where you camp before starting the 1400 ft rock climb to the summit of the mountain. By the time we got 3/4 of the way up it started raining and sleeting and by the time we got to the small cliff it was raining ice. We decided it would be too dangerous to try and climb the cliff with our backpacks because it was icing up really bad. We hiked down a couple hundred yards and made a bivy next to a huge boulder and had some hot food and drink (I was freezing my ass off). By the time we were done eating it started to clear up so we decided to climb the small cliff (without gear) to the Lower Saddle and check out the start of the climb. From where we were you could see into Idaho and what we saw was a giant black sky so we decide to go back down to the tent. By the time we got to the bottom of the small cliff it started sleeting again. We looked back up the cliff and like out of a movie you could see the black cloud roll over the cliff. As we raced back to the tent we ran into two more groups and recommended they pitch camp now. We continued to the tent and dove in cold and wet. During the night a terrible storm raged. There were lightning strikes so close that you could see the bolts through the tent walls, rock slides with boulders the size of cars rolling down the mountain and 60+ mph winds. Needless to say I didnít get much sleep wondering if one of the rockslides would take us out. In the morning when I decided to brave opening the tent and we found that it had snowed over 10 inches and there were snow drifts several feet deep. Itís the middle of summer, WTF. The mountain had decided not to let us up. So, we packed our stuff and headed down. The narrow switch back trail was hidden beneath the snow so we had trouble finding the safe route down. However, the fact that I can write this means we did ok getting down. It was amazing because after we got below 9000í it was very nice. Along the way down we passed several groups going up and told them about the conditions, however it was so nice down low that they didnít believe us. It ended up snowing for the next 5 days and we did not get to summit that year.

    I learned a lot about mountaineering on this trip. The only thing I messed up on was I didnít bring good gloves so my hand kept getting numb from the cold (I havenít made that mistake again). We went back the next year and made the summit via Lower and Upper Exum. We also did Petzoldt ridge as an extra climb.

  13. #13

    Smile Mountains

    Not a mountaineer but have had a lifelong fascination with mountains.

    My formative years were spent on the Plateau/Mt.Royal and one of my earliest memories is spending part of a Sunday with my parents looking at Montreal from the two Mount Royal look-outs.Later while visiting family friends in Vermont we went on an outing to Jay Peak when there was only the partial lift and climbed to the top.The 360 degree,top of the world view and sensation are still with me.

    Over the years some of my best vacations or getaways have been spent on mountains and I regularly will drive out of my way to take the scenic route thru mountains.As for thrills no rollercoaster can match the trip down the 77 from the 81 to Statesville,N.C.

  14. #14
    franky sayz
    NYCLIMBer good job on the lower and upper exum. That is a really really good route. The lower has wonderful and difficult climbing. the black wall is the highlight of the climb. I am jealous. I have done the lower exum but not the upper.
    franky

  15. #15

    Challenging Hiking Destinations around Montreal

    I am not a climber but I hike and occasionally do scrambling as well. I section hiked most of NJ and NY portion of AT. I hiked up Mt.Tremblant thrice to save on lift ticket so that I can spend another hour with a SP without going over budget. Anyway what are some of the more challenging day-trip or over-nighter hiking destination around Montreal wtihout crossing the border?

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