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Thread: Just wondering if anyone knows what the latest version of Linux is?

  1. #1
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    Just wondering if anyone knows what the latest version of Linux is?

    Just wondering if anyone knows what the latest version of Linux is and where I can download it from?

    I'm looking to set up a network using Linux's NOS capabilities.

    Thanks all for your time.

  2. #2
    Well, latest stable kernel release is 2.6.15.4 if thats what you want to know...

    Here you can download the latest kernel releases... www.kernel.org

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by zigezon
    Well, latest stable kernel release is 2.6.15.4 if thats what you want to know...

    Here you can download the latest kernel releases... www.kernel.org
    Thanks for the link. Forgive me if I ask one more question as I'm just becoming familiar with Linux.

    Which patch do I download first?

    What I want to do is download the OS (operating system), then burn it to a CD so I can install the OS to a blank computer directly from the CD and allow Network Operating System properties to be enabled.

    I went to this page http://mirrors.kernel.org/ which they suggested for beginners. But I'm not sure which version would be the best to download for networking?

    If you can be of help to my question, that would be great. Thanks for your time.
    Last edited by Johnny; 02-23-2006 at 09:13 PM.

  4. #4
    Well,

    I'm not sure what u mean as a NOS.
    Everything is NOS nowadays, windows, Mac, linux, they all support networking capability. Is that what you mean, you want a linux that is capable of surfing the net for instance?

    I suggest you read on linux. First of all. You dont actually only download a kernel. You need to download a distribution...

    A linux distrition is a linux flavored system.

    A distribution analogy could be seen like this: Windows 95, Windows NT, Windows Me, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and soon Windows Vista...
    They are all different, but underneath they are all a windows kernel. Most of these Windows do the same thing but each one has it's own speacial things it can do they other dont...

    Soo, a linux distribution, a linux with a different taste of it..
    A little list of distributions: Red Hat's Fedora Core, Mandrake, Suse, Knoppix, there are 100's of those...

    The mostly used and the one you should maybe begin with is Fedora Core...

    And Knoppix is a LiveCD distribution. Meaning you dont need to install it on your hard drive like the others, or like Windows. It runs out of the CD. Its great for trying out linux. And you cant fuck up your computer that way... You just reboot...


    Forget about the kernel thing, I tought u meant something more specific. I suggest your read on Tutorials about Linux...
    Last edited by zigezon; 02-23-2006 at 10:29 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by zigezon
    Well,

    I'm not sure what u mean as a NOS.
    Everything is NOS nowadays, windows, Mac, linux, they all support networking capability. Is that what you mean, you want a linux that is capable of surfing the net for instance?

    I suggest you read on linux. First of all. You dont actually only download a kernel. You need to download a distribution...

    A linux distrition is a linux flavored system.

    A distribution analogy could be seen like this: Windows 95, Windows NT, Windows Me, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and soon Windows Vista...
    They are all different, but underneath they are all a windows kernel. Most of these Windows do the same thing but each one has it's own speacial things it can do they other dont...

    Soo, a linux distribution, a linux with a different taste of it..
    A little list of distributions: Red Hat's Fedora Core, Mandrake, Suse, Knoppix, there are 100's of those...

    The mostly used and the one you should maybe begin with is Fedora Core...

    And Knoppix is a LiveCD distribution. Meaning you dont need to install it on your hard drive like the others, or like Windows. It runs out of the CD. Its great for trying out linux. And you cant fuck up your computer that way... You just reboot...


    Forget about the kernel thing, I tought u meant something more specific. I suggest your read on Tutorials about Linux...
    My apologies with the NOS (network operating system). For example Windows Server 2000/03, Novell Netware and so on. I'm looking to use Linux's networking capabilities as I'm setting up a network using 10 computers (all using win XP) and 2 routers to split up the network.

    I've already set up a small network using Win server 2003 but as technology changes, many companies will start using Linux as a network server b/c it's free.

    I was looking through these Red Hat's Fedora Core, Mandrake, Suse which you mentioned. Is there a preference between these 3 for networking?

    Thanks for your time, it's appreciated.

  6. #6
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    Fedora Core 4

    Fedora Core 4 is the latest.
    Download it here:

    http://fedora.redhat.com/

    Check out the installation guide and all the available info.
    Have fun!
    Just keep smiling...it keeps them guessing.

  7. #7
    Go with Fedora Core if your starting...

    But, as you goo along, you might want to switch to NetBSD or other BSD sytem which is amongs the most reliable system.

    Using a Linux network server to handle DHCP and some network filesystem is all right. But to go beyong that and fully mimic the Windows Server capabilities is going to be a hard-earned task... Depends on the level of complexity of your network...

    It's like, if you want to race in Formula 1, well, you buy yourself a Formula 1, or you can get a Mustang and customize soo much that it will do about the same job as the Formula 1 car...

    Most people I know who use Linux servers dont use it soo much to handle network (dhcp, domains, etc), but more to provide network services such as HTTP, FTP, Database, Backup, simple network filesystem, etc...


    Anyhow, good luck.

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